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Full text of "Report of the December 1986 National Meeting of the Training Resources and Data Exchange"

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TRADE '86 

Conference Report 




Report of the December 1986 

National Meeting of the 

Training Resources and Data Exchange 

Prepared by the 

Federal Emergency Management Agency 

National Fire Academy 

Field Programs Division 



TRADE '86 Report 




Federal Emergency Management Agency 

Washington, D.C. 20472 



Dear Conference Participants, 

On November 30, 1986, one hundred and fifty-seven representatives of State, MetropoHtan 
and Mihtary fire training organizations from throughout the Nation met at the National Fire 
Academy (NFA) for the second Training Resource and Data Exchange (TRADE) National 
Conference. This historic event marked the coming of age of TRADE as an effective and 
successful program to foster the exchange of ideas, programs, and curricula among and 
between Federal, State, and local fire training organizations. 

The many new ideas and innovative programs shared during TRADE '86 have enriched 
the curriculum-planning and instructional programs of fire training organizations through- 
out the Nation. The input from the conference participants to NFA and the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency's curriculum planning efforts will provide vital and 
continuing guidance to Federal frre training programs for many years to come. 

During the time of the TRADE '86 Conference, I also had the personal satisfaction of 
administering the oath of office to the Academy's new Superintendent, W. M. Neville, Jr. 
I was especially pleased that the conference participants were able to share with me in this 
important event. Your presence symbolized for me the spirit of partnership and 
cooperation, across all levels of government and public service, that is the true backbone 
of our Nation's fire training efforts and initiatives. 

It is with great pleasure that I congratulate you on your landmark achievements in building 
and fostering the ever-growing national TRADE network. Through your combined efforts, 
we may all join together - at all levels of govemment throughout the United States - to 
continue to strive for excellence in training, education, and service to America's 
firefighters and emergency services personnel. 



Sincerely, 




Preface 



Preface 



It is with great pleasure that I present to the membership of the Training Resources and Data Exchange 
(TRADE) this report of the second national TRADE Conference, held here at the Academy in 
December, 1986. 

TRADE is a unique and very exciting opportunity for the nation's fire training organizations. It is also 
an important responsiblity for all of us. I would like to underscore my personal commitment that the 
Academy will, in the years to come, maintain a close and attentive relationship with the membership of 
TRADE. This commitment includes our continued efforts to support and encourage the exchange of 
local training programs and ideas through the TRADE networks, and our resolve to listen closely to the 
feedback and guidance that the TRADE membership can provide to Academy programs and initiatives. 

The many ideas and suggestions offered to the Academy by the participants of TRADE '86 have 
already had a significant impact on Academy planning. Some of the program changes that have already 
been implemented as a result of input from TRADE include:(l) the modularization of all NFA hand- 
off courses, beginning with 1987 handoff courses Preparing for Incident Command and Commanding 
the Initial Response; (2) the initiation of the development process for a new Leadership curriculum, for 
field delivery and hand-off; and (3) the establishment of first responders and response team members 
as the top priorities for hazardous materials training. 

There are numerous other suggestions and proposals for enrichment of Academy programs and 
policies which resulted fi-om TRADE '86 and which are presently being considered and evaluated. Our 
on-going dialogues with the TRADE membership will highlight these different issues as they are 
further explored and discussed. 

The heart of TRADE is not the Academy. Rather it is you, the members of TRADE, and your efforts to 
promote the vital exchange of fire training information and knowledge between our nation's many and 
varied fire training organizations. This report cannot do justice to the innumerable contributions, 
ideas, and programs shared and offered among and between the participants of TRADE '86. This 
Conference, and the ever-growing national TRADE networks, reflect a true collaboration between 
Federal, State, and local fire training organizations. Because of the efforts and dedication of hundreds 
of fire training professionals and organizations from throughout America, TRADE is a dynamic and 
growing partnership whose time has come 



WUUam M. Neville, Jr.^^ 
Superintendent 
National Fire Academy 



TRADE '86 Report 



Introduction 



Report Introduction 



The programs and events of the TRADE '86 
Conference were designed to serve as foun- 
dations for further growth in the Regional and 
National TRADE networks, and to further the 
goals of the TRADE concept. These goals are: to 
identify fire service training needs at the National 
and Regional levels; to recognize and promote the 
exchange of exemplary training programs and 
resources throughout the Nation; and to provide 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency and 
the National Fire Academy with guidance on how 
to best serve the needs of the Nation's fire 
service through training and education. 

In support of these goals, the TRADE '86 con- 
ference included intensive regional TRADE meet- 
ings and National meetings of State, Metro, and 
Military TRADE groups. Attendees participated 
in a series of working sessions to provide Na- 
tional guidance and input on such subjects as the 
FEMA Five- Year Curriculum Management Plan, 
current Academy Curriculum and Deployment 
Planning, the Academy's Train-the-Trainer Pro- 
gram, and the refinement of the national TRADE 
network. The National TRADE-ing Post exhibit 
program premiered in TRADE '86, and 



featured exhibits of exemplary programs from 
training organizations throughout the United 
States. Seven special interest seminars were 
presented at the conference, addressing such 
current fire service issues as: Women in the Fire 
Service; Occupational Safety and Health 
Programs; and the Incident Command System. 

This report provides highlights of the activities 
and programs of TRADE '86, and documents the 
principal national issues and topics that were 
addressed by participants during the conference. 

This document also represents an effort by the 
National Fire Academy staff to commemorate 
and honor the efforts and achievements of the 
nation's fire training professionals in creating and 
building the national Training Resources and 
Data Exchange networks. The report was 
coordinated and prepared by William D. Lewis, 
Senior Education Specialist, Field Programs Di- 
vision, Nadonal Fire Academy, under the 
direction of J. Faherty Casey, Deputy Superinten- 
dent, Field Programs Division, National Fire 
Academy. 



TRADE '86 Report 



Report Index 



Report Index 



NATIONAL MEETINGS 1 

State Directors of Fire Training 2 

Metropolitan Fire Department Training Officals 7 

Military Fire Training Systems 8 

CONFERENCE SESSIONS AND SURVEYS 9 

FEMA Five- Year Curriculum Management Plan 10 

NFA Curriculum Development and Deployment 11 

Train-the-Trainer 13 

Refining TRADE 14 

Additional Surveys 17 

SPECIAL CONFERENCE EVENTS 19 

New Superintendent 20 

TRADE-ing Post 21 

Special Interest Seminars 22 

Conference Banquet 24 

APPENDICES 25 

Planner and Presenter Acknowledgements 27 

List of Attendees 28 

FEMA Five- Year Curriculum Plan Survey Results 35 

NFA Curriculum Survey Results 43 

Teleconference Survey Results 68 

State Certification Program Matrix 71 

Sample: Request for Student Manuals Form 72 

Sample: Course Information Data Postcard 74 



TRADE '86 Report 



TRADE '86 Report 



National Meetings 




National 
Meetings 



At the 1986 National TRADE Conference, time 
was allotted for the State Directors of Fire 
Training and the Metropolitan Fire Department 
Training Officials to have separate group 
meetings to address issues of specific concern for 
the respective groups. Mr. Louis J. Amabili, 
Director, Delaware State Fire School, and Mr. 
Gerald Monigold, Director, Illinois Fire Service 
Institute, were designated as co-chairs to facilitate 
the State Directors' meetings. Deputy Chief 
Roger Ramsey, Seattle Fire Department, and 
Battalion Chief John Nunes, Tucson Fire 
Department, were designated as co-chairs to 
facilitate the Metropolitan Fire Department 
Training Officials' meetings. 



TRADE '86 Report 
1 



National Meetings 



STATE DIRECTORS 

The major concerns and issues of the State Directors, or their representatives. Following is 

Directors were addressed to Superintendent a copy of the State Directors' letter and 

William M. Neville, Jr., in the form of a letter Superintendent Neville's response, 
signed by all but two of the attending State 



Sttait® Fir© Traimieg Dif®Gtt(0)ir§ 



William M. Neville, Jr., Superintendent 
National Fire Academy 
Emmitsburg, Maryland 



Dear Superintendent Neville: 

On December 4, 1986 the undersigned State Fire Training Directors met at the National Fire Academy in 
Emmitsburg, MD. During this meeting several areas of concern were identified and discussed. We are 
forwarding to you a list of statements covering these concems for your study and action. A written 
response to these concerns is respectfully solicited within a period of 60 days of your receipt of this 
communication. 

Our concerns in regard to the National Fire Academy are as follows: 

1 . Statutory responsibility for curriculum development and approval is the sole responsibility 
of the Superintendent of the National Fire Academy. It appears the current organizational 
structure of FEIvIA is in conflict with the statutory mandate of the National Fire Academy as 
specified in Public Law 93-498. It is the position of the State Fire Training Directors that the 
Superintendent of the National Fire Academy should exercise his role as specified in the 
current law. Roles need to be clarified immediately. 

2. The current selection program for adjunct faculty Is inadequate. We recommend that a 
more stringent and rigorous process for the uniform selection of highly qualified adjunct 
faculty be developed for resident and field programs of the National Fire Academy. 

3. There is an Immediate need to change the current student selection criteria to make the 
process nnore equitable. The current procedure (first come-first serve; two per department 
per course; one trip per year; etc.) does not albw for equal opportunity for qualified 
students to attend the National Fire Academy. 

4. There is a need to continue to evaluate the quality of resident programs at the National Fire 
Academy. The quality of the courses must keep abreast of the changes in technology and 
techniques. The National Fire Academy should institute a system for a periodic update and 
revision of the curriculum of resident courses. 

5. Quarterly reports on National Fire Academy resident course attendance by state should be 
sent directly to each individual State Fire Training Driector. There is also a need to develop 
a separate report of National Fire Academy resident course admission and rejection data by 
state. This report should be shared with all State Fire Training Directors. 

6. There is some conflicting conceptions among State Fire Training Directors over the current 
procedures for the delivery of Train-the-Trainer programs for the Natbnal Fire Academy. 
There is a need to develop and distribute to all State Fire Training Directors a current 
policy statement on Train-the-Trainer programs, and a procedure on the use of these 
matenals 



TRADE '86 Report 



National Meetings 



7. We encourage the National Fire Academy to share with State Fire Training Directors all 
course materials of all resident programs. A written procedure should be established on 
this matter and distributed to all State Fire Training Directors. 

8. We have a concern over the current status and function of the National Fire Academy 
Board of Visitors. We ask for a clarification of the present role and status of the Board of 
Visitors and that all State Training Directors be sent the periodic reports (i.e. minutes or 
proceedings) of this group. 

9. We would strongly encourage the National Fire Academy to deliver and support the 
delivery of selected resident courses in the field in cooperation with the State Fire Training 
Directors. 

1 0. Current graduates of the resident hazardous materials courses at the National Fire 
Academy retum to their department or organization with a false sense of being an 
"expert" in hazardous materials. This misconception, implied or intended, must be clarified 
to all students in this program and their sponsoring agencies. 

11. We questbn the value and effectiveness of the 13 week fellowship program at the National 
Fire Academy and recommend that it be discontinued immediately. 

1 2. The proposed hazardous materials team member course includes plans for extensive 
hands-on practical skills training. It is inappropriate for the Natbnal Fire Academy to 
conduct this type of skills training as a resident program at the National Fire Academy. We 
support the devetopment of this program as a hand-off training package to the state and 
metro training programs. 



Thank you for your consideration of these concerns. We took fonward to the continuation of our wori<ing 
relationship to improve the quality of our Nattonal Fire Academy. 



Sincerely, 



James P. McNeill, Associate Director 
Nattonal Fire Academy Board of Visitors 
All State Fire Training Directors 



TRADE '86 Report 



National Meetings 



Response to State Directors from NFA Superintendent William M. Neville, Jr. 




Federal Emergency Management Agency 



National Emergency Training Center 
Emmitsburg, Maryland 21727 



February 19, 1987 



Dear 

This is in response to a letter forwarded to me over your signature. Please 
forgive the tardy response, but as you no doubt understand, I have been 
"swamped" with many matters during my first few weeks at the National Fire 
Academy (NFA). 

Before I begin to respond to the specific points in your letter, please allow 
me to make a general statement. 1 sincerely appreciate receiving your comments, 
and I want to maintain an open line of communication with State Fire Training 
Directors, and that means both ways. May I suggest, however, that you include 
in your critiques, more substantive statements of rationale and recommended 
systems' changes. 

Your concern about curriculum development I assume relates to the specific 
powers given to the Superintendent in Section 7 of our Public Law, and a 
proposed statement of functions for the National Emergency Training Center's 
Office of Programs and Academics. I am aware of the perceived conflict, and 
I have discussed it with the Associate Director of Training and Fire Programs. 
I consider my responsibility for curriculum development to be of the highest 
importance, and in discussions with the Associate Director have been assured 
that my responsibility is not and will not be superseded. 

I share your concern about the adjunct faculty selection process, and I have 
established a review of these procedures as a priority item. You need to 
understand that there is a distinction in the selection process between 
"resident" and "field" adjuncts. Are you indicating dissatisfaction with 
current processes? It is my understanding that the current procedures 
did receive input from some members of your group and that' the State Fire 
Training Directors are part of the selection process. I request that your 
group forward to me your specific recommendations for a revised selection 
process. 

I also agree with your concern regarding the student selection criteria. I, 
therefore, request that your organization forward to me your specific recom- 
mendations on a student selection process including criteria for selection. 

Again, I am in complete agreement with your concern regarding the need for 
periodic update and revision of resident course curricula (I have similar 
concerns for the field courses). I will be instituting a study to determine 
whether or not the number of courses offered should be reduced in order to 
provide sufficient staff time for such updates. It is my opinion that such 
updates and revisions should be managed by responsible NFA instructional 
staff. I would be interested in any specific concerns you have. 



TRADE '86 Repon 



National Meetings 



I believe your request for resident course attendance data is reasonable and 
I will request staff to make recommendations for such a system. The exact 
information to be contained in that report will be developed by NFA staff and 
submitted to your organization for comment. I would be interested in your 
reasons for having rejection data since that data would require significant 
staff effort to recover. 

I have directed the Field Program Deputy Superintendent to distribute to 
State Fire Training Directors (as well as Metro Training Chiefs) a policy 
statement on Train-the-Trainer Programs. I have a personal concern regarding 
our ability to adequately monitor these programs and encourage your specific 
input on this subject, I have also been told that certain trainers do not 
exhibit adequate understanding of the subject matter. Again, I would appreciate 
your input on known instances. 

In reviewing your request to share "all course materials of all resident 
programs," it is unclear to me as to exactly what is being requested or why. 
As you may or may not know, certain materials used at NFA are utilized under 
specific permission from authors who have copyright protection for slides, video 
tapes, graphs, etc. In these instances, we are severely limited as to our 
ability to share them with other persons. Further, there would be some 
significant expense in making copies for all State Fire Training Directors 
and Metro Fire Training Directors. I would appreciate some clarification of 
your concern on this matter. 

I share your concern over the function of the National Fire Academy Board of 
Visitors (BOV). For your information, the Director of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency has been requested by the Associate Director in charge of 
Training and Fire Programs to review a modified Charter. I have been asked for 
direct input on the matter and have provided that input. We recently held a 
BOV meeting, and the Board members also expressed concern for a clearer 
definition of their role and function, I consider the BOV to be an important 
adjunct to our mission, and want to work with them in establishing a useful^ 
and supportive role. We plan to make appropriate distribution of the Board s 
actions and activities and the distribution will surely include the State 
Fire Training Directors. 

I am delighted with your encouragement to offer selected NFA resident courses 
in cooperation with State Fire Training Directors. For your information, we 
are at this time considering such an offering in early, 1987, as a test of the 
ability to transfer these programs in this manner. You will be made aware 
of the results of this test. You may be aware that two previous tests were 
less than successful in the view of NFA staff. 

Your concern regarding graduates of the hazardous materials course is shared 
by staff at the NFA. I must in all candor advise you that I am even more 
concerned by the lack of a training standard for hazardous material responders 
and regulators throughout our country. It is my understanding that the 
National Fire Protection Association is now involved in the development of such 
a standard, that effort is certainly welcome by me, however, there is no 
guarantee that someone meeting that standard will be adequately trained to meet 
every situation. Further, I think you will agree with me that there are 
other areas within the fire service that share the problem of "self-proclaimed 
experts." 



TRADE '86 Report 



National Meetings 



Your eleventh (11th) item causes me some concern. The 13 week- fellowship 
program, as such, was terminated some time ago. I assume you are referring 
to what is now termed "Command and Staff" program. Although there are good 
reasons for evaluating and improving this program, and we are, I do not accept 
your recommendation to discontinue the program. We have received very favor- 
able comments from the recent participants of this program and from their 
superiors, who do not agree with your recommendation. I do not know your 
reasons for wanting to discontinue the course and would like to receive them 
in further detai 1 . 

At this time, I find that I do not agree with your position that it is inappro- 
priate for NFA to conduct hands-on practical skills training. I assume that 
your concerns arise from the original concept for the NFA not to compete with 
or duplicate existing State and local training efforts and that the Academy 
was not intended to be a "hands-on" training facility. However, I believe it 
quite appropriate for NFA programs to include whatever type of training is 
necessary during development phases of educational courses. I believe that 
it may be necessary for this institution to be a "model" for other training 
facilities where more sophisticated training equipment is essential. I do 
agree that in the long run, such training will necessarily have to be absorbed 
by State and local training programs. 

Thank you for your concern for the National Fire Academy. Without your input 
and efforts this Academy could and would not exist. Please feel free to in- 
dividually or as an organization call or communicate by letter with me at 
any time with the full knowledge that your input is sincerely valued. 

Sincerely, 



W. M. Neville, Jr. 
Superintendent 
National Fire Academy 



TRADE '86 Report 



National Meetings 



METROPOLITAN FIRE DEPARTMENT TRAINING OFFICIALS 



The primary focus of the metropolitan dehbera- 
tions could be characterized as a search for 
clarification with regard to student selection for 
on-campus resident programs and Academy 
procedures for selection of adjunct faculty. 

Question : Does the Academy admissions 
procedure set forth a quota or number of 
positions designated for a specific State and/or 
department? 

Response : While it is a primary objective of the 
Academy to assure balanced student representa- 
tion from across the Nation, there are no set 
quotas for states or departments. 

The Academy has a long-standing operational 
policy that an individual will be allowed only one 
trip to the Academy per year. However, while at 
the Academy, the individual may take more than 
one course, such as participants in the Command 
and Staff Program (CSP). CSP students are 
required to complete five resident courses over a 
twelve-week period. 

Question : Qn the assumption that most resident 
course offerings are over-subscribed, what is the 
determining factor for accepting applicants? 

Response : When it is determined that an 
applicant successfully meets the selection criteria 
for a specific course, he/she is placed on the 
acceptance class roster based upon postmark of 



FOCUS ON.,.. 

• Student Selection 
for Resident 
Programs Courses 

• Selection of 
Adjunct Faculty 



applications. This process is continued until all 
classes are filled. 

STATEMENT AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

A concern was stated that the acceptance of 
qualified students on an earliest postmark basis 
was unequitable. This observation was based 
upon the fact that all departments do not receive 
and distribute the Academy catalog in an 
expedient manner. It was also pointed out that in 
the larger departments the chain of command 
(approval authority) and process procedure 
require greater lead time. It was recommended 
that applications continue to be processed upon 
receipt against selection criteria, but that 
acceptance be postponed until a certain date; i.e., 
60 days prior to class date, and that postmark of 
application not be the determining factor, but 
rather geographical distribution, fire service 
population, or other more equitable criteria. 

As a result of this inquiry, the Superin- 
tendent is conducting a review of the 
entire student selection process for Acad- 
emy resident courses. Any change 
which may result from this review will 
be communicated to the participating 
TRADE organizations, as well as pub- 
lished in the Academy course catalog. 

Question : What are the Academy standards and 
procedures for selection of adjunct instructional 
faculty? 

Response : Individuals interested in being 
considered for adjunct faculty appointments 
should indicate their interest in writing and 
submit their inquiry to the National Emergency 
Training Center, Office of Management and 
Administration, Procurement Division, 16825 
South Seton Avenue, Emmitsburg, Maryland 
21727. 

Upon receipt of inquiry, a packet which explains 
the application procedure and sets forth 
educational requirements, desired level of subject- 
matter content experience, and instructional skill 
requirements is sent to the applicant. 

For those applicants who indicate an interest in 
being considered for instructing on-site resident 



TRADE '86 Report 



National Meetings 



courses, his/her application is forwarded to the 
program chairperson responsible for the 
course(s) that the applicant has indicated an 
interest in instructing. The program chair 
reviews the application against the established 
selection criteria, makes a determination of 
acceptability, and notifies the applicant of the 
status of hisAier application. This is an ongoing 
process, and applications are reviewed 
throughout the year. 



For those applicants who indicate an interest in 
being considered for off-site field delivery, 
his/her application is forwarded to the Field 
Programs Division (FPD) for review and proces- 
sing. Applications for adjunct field instructors 
are reviewed on an annual basis and undergo an 
extensive review process which considers not 
only the applicant's qualifications, but also the 
national field delivery schedule which establishes 
the parameters on the number of adjunct faculty 
required from the various geographical regions 
across the country. 



MILITARY FIRE TRAINING SYSTEMS 



For the first time, representatives from the U.S. 
Armed Forces attended the National TRADE 
Conference. Although only the Air Force 
representative attended the full Conference, the 
Navy and Marine Corps representatives were able 
to attend portions of the Conference. The Army 
representative, unable to attend, was represented 
by members of the Federal Fire Service Task 
Group. 



A meeting was held with 
the Air Force, Marine 
Corps, Navy representa- 
tives, and Academy staff 
personnel. The military 
representatives confirmed 
the importance of TRADE; 
however, they felt that the 
primary benefits for the 





mihtary would be from active participation on the 
regional level rather than the national level. 

The Marine Corps and the Navy fire protection 
systems strongly urge their local fire departments 
to actively utilize State fire training programs and 
to develop active automatic mutual aid agreements 
with neighboring departments. Such agreements 
have fostered improved operations at emergencies 
and are increasing training 
opportunities as well. 

The Navy is actively 
utilizing NFA Train-the- 
Trainer (TtT) programs 
while the Air Force and 
the Army have also imple- 
mented, but to a lesser 
degree, these hand-off in- 
structional training pack- 
ages. The Marine Corps 
approach encourages local 
unit usage through State 
fire training systems. 

It has been difficult for the 
Armed Forces to fully 
implement NFA TtT pack- 
ages by virtue of their activities and the inability 
to designate one person as their national/ 
international trainer of trainers. It appears likely 
that Coast Guard participation will be very 
limited, except perhaps in activities related to 
hazardous materials and Marine (Waterbom) 
firefighting, as there are no full-time fire-related 
personnel ratings or Coast Guard fire 
departments. 



TRADE '86 Report 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 




Conference 

Sessions 

and Surveys 

The program for the 1986 National TRADE 
Conference included a series of special working 
sessions which addressed important Academy 
and TRADE program issues and policies. These 
working sessions focused on the long-term 
FEMA Five- Year Curriculum Management Plan, 
on short-term Academy curriculum and 
deployment planning, on Train-the-Trainer, and 
on the refinement of the national TRADE 
network. During these working sessions, and at 
other times during the conference, attendees 
were asked to provide feedback and guidance on 
these program matters through a series of 
question-naires and surveys. The input provided 
by TRADE on these topics provides the National 
Fire Academy and the national TRADE network 
organizations with an invaluable assessment of 
the fire service's training needs, goals, and 
priorities. This input will contribute greatly to our 
combined efforts to better target our training 
activities, and to better serve the fire service at all 
levels of the Federal, State, and local training 
spectrum. 



TRADE '86 Report 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 



FEMA FIVE-YEAR CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN 



At this working session, all members of TRADE 
were briefed on FEMA's mandate to develop a 
five-year curriculum management plan and on 
NFA's commitment to use TRADE (and other 
fire service organizations) to obtain accurate 
information concerning fire service training needs 
throughout the country. 

For each region, participants formed into small 
work groups and were asked to (1) Ust the top 
trends likely to affect the fire service over the 
next five years and their impact on training 
needs, (2) list the most serious performance 
problems in the fire service and their impact on 
training needs, and (3) discuss the input TRADE 
members would Hke to have into the curriculum 
management planning process. 

The predominant trend or change was the 
increased competition for financial resources. 
Seven of the nineteen small groups reported this 
as a trend and six of those groups ranked it as the 
most important trend likely to affect the fire 
service. 



TOP TREND AFFECTING 
FIRE SERVICE OVER NEXT 
FIVE YEARS.... 

INCREASED 
COMPETITION 
FOR FINANCIAL 
RESOURCES 



The predominant performance problem was a 
lack of management and supervisory skills, both 
at incident scenes as well as in non emergency 
periods. The need for more training in 
communications, interpersonal skills, leadership 
ability, and managerial skills was mentioned time 
and again. 

Participants were asked for suggestions about the 
possibility of having TRADE provide input 




regularly into the five-year curriculum planning 
process. Nearly every response was positive 
about TRADE having a role in this area. Many 
people said they could send representatives to 
NFA for a working group, although several 
added that they would need funding from NFA to 
do so. 



TOP PERFORMANCE 
PROBLEM IN THE 
FIRE SERVICE.... 

LACK OF 

MANAGEMENT AND 
SUPERVISORY SKILLS, 
ON AND OFF THE 
FIREGROUND 



This information will be provided to all NFA 
managers and a copy will be given to each 
member of any group analyzing NFA 
curriculum. The complete results are located in 
the Appendix of this report. 



TRADE '86 Report 
10 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 



NFA CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 
AND DEPLOYMENT VALIDATION 



At this working session, all members of TRADE 
were briefed on current NFA short-term 
curriculum planning for upcoming course 
development efforts and on specific changes in 
methodology and delivery formats that are 
currently being considered. Topics addressed in 
the briefing were: the proposed FPD Leadership 
curriculum; the proposed NFA Hazardous 
Materials curriculum; the proposed NFA Fire 
Prevention curriculum; the proposed FPD Safety 
curriculum, modularization of FPD courses; 
instructor-led versus self-study course 
methodology; and the use of wallet-sized course 
summary cards. 

In regional workgroups, participants were asked 
to discuss and answer a series of questions 
addressing issues related to the proposed 
development projects and topics. 

Leadership 

Under the topic of Leadership, participants were 
asked (1) to assess their organization's need for 
the proposed hand-off courses, (2) to evaluate 
the capability of their instructors to deliver the 
courses, and (3) to prioritize proposed topics in 
terms of their perceived local needs. 

There was an extremely strong expression of 
need for the proposed courses, which is not 
surprising in light of the earlier conclusion that 
the top national performance problem for training 
is the lack of management and supervisory skills. 
There was a strong expression of confidence in 
the ability of local instructors to teach the 
proposed curriculum. 



STRONG NEED 
FOR THE 
PROPOSED 
LEADERSHIP 
CURRICULUM 



\ 



Fire Prevention 

For Fire Prevention, participants were asked to 
assess the amount of prevention and code 
enforcement training occurring in their 
jurisdiction, specifically in terms of percentage of 
overall training activity, and to suggest 
programmatic solutions to the problems of (1) 
low national emphasis on prevention and (2) 
insufficient numbers of technically qualified 
instructors nationally. The averaged responses, 
nationally, showed that 16.6% of local training 
activity addresses prevention at the company 
officer level, and 14.2% of local training activity 
is specifically related to fire code enforcement. 
These levels were perceived as significantly low 
by some and quite appropriate by others (given 
other competing training demands). 



IS NATIONAL FIRE 
PREVENTION TRAINING 
ADEQUATE?,... 

16.6% OF LOCAL TRAINING 
ADDRESSES PREVENTION 
FOR THE COMPANY 
OFFICER 

142% SPECIFICALLY 
ADDRESSES CODE 
ENFORCEMENT 



Hazardous Materials 

For Hazardous Materials, an NFA curriculum 
proposal had been sent to participants for their 
review prior to coming to TRADE. During this 
session, participants were asked: (1) to prioritize 
the training audiences, described in the report, in 
terms of their perceived local needs; (2) to give 
an overall reaction to the proposed Field 
Programs Division (FPD) courses and to the 
proposed Resident Programs Division (RPD) 
courses; (3) to provide an open-ended analysis 
and review of the report and the proposed 

TRADE '86 Report 
11 



Conference Sessions and Sunevs 



curriculum; (4) to respond to a specific proposal 

to hand off the RPD Hazardous Materials Tactical 
Considerations course; and (5) to comment on 
their ability to deliver, after hand-off. the rather 
large number of proposed FPD hazardous 
materials courses. The top national priorities for 
hazardous materials training were First 
Responders. follo\\ed by Hazardous Materials 
Response Team Members and Officers. The 
overall reactions to the proposed on- and off- 
campus curriculums were mildly positive. Many 
participants expressed the concern that the 
program was too ambitious and required too 
many new courses. This was also reflected in 
some expression of reser\-ations about ha\ing the 
resources locally to deliver all the courses. There 

TOP TRA I My G TARGETS 
FOR yPA HAZARDOUS 
MATERIALS CURRICULUM,... 

L FIRST RESPONDERS 




2. HAZ MAT RESPONSE 
TEAM MEMBERS 

3. HAZ MAT RESPONSE 
TEAM OFFICERS 



was some expression of interest in the proposal 
to hand off the resident Hazardous Materials 
Tactical Considerations course (one-third were 
interested, one-third not sure, one-third were not 
interested). The major reservations were the 
$15,000 cost and the requirement to deliver the 
course six times a year. 

Delivery Formats 

For deli\er\- formats, participants uere asked to 
evaluate the proposal to modularize all hand-off 
courses, to indicate methodology preferences 
(self-study versus instructor-based programs), to 
evaluate the suitability of a resource kft package 
format, and to evaluate a proposal to distribute 



ONE-THIRD OF THE TKADE 
ORGANIZATIONS WERE 
STRONGLY INTERESTED 
IN RECEIVING A HAND-OFF 
OF THE RESIDENT HAZ MAT 
TACTICS COURSE. THE 
MAJOR CONCERNS .ARE: 

• COST 

• REOUIRED NUMBER 
I OFl)ELnTRIES 



course summary wallet-sized plastic cards to 
students attending NFA hand-off courses. There 
was a remarkably strong, almost unanimous 
suppon for modularization of NFA hand-off 
courses, preferably in segments 1 to 3 hours in 
length. The resource kit format was well 
received as a component to be combined with 
traditional instructional packaging. There was no 
clear preference for instractional methodolog>' 
formats (self- study versus computer-based 
versus instructor-based). 



r 



MjLUOSr UNANIMOUS 

kREOUEST FOR m 

MODUL^ARIZATION OF 
KAND-OFF COURSES 




The complete results are located in the Appendix 
of this repon. 



TRADE '86 Repon 



12 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 



TRAIN-THE-TRAINER 

Student Manual Support Program and 
Train-the-Trainer Delivery Reporting 



At this working session, a short presentation 
was made on the Academy's Student Manual 
Support Program and Train-the-Trainer (TtT) 
reporting. It focused on how an authorized, 
eligible, andparticipating State/Metro fire training 
system gets TtT Student Manuals and reports the 
number of instructors and end-users reached. 

Referring to two forms, the brief presentation 
was designed to cover: 



AIVS5BI1* 
STyDENT 



(A) The "Request for Student 
Manual" form (February 1987), 
used for requesting Student 
Manuals at least 45 days prior to 
the start of a scheduled 
State/Metro delivery of a TtT 
course, and 

(B) The use of the "Course 
Information Data" card (FEMA 
form 16-13, 5/84; postcard) to 
transmit information to the 
Academy about participants 
reached (see copies of these 
forms in the Appendix of this 
report). 

Many at the TRADE conference 
felt that actual utilization of NFA ^^^^^^^ 
TtT instructional packages is ^^^^^^^ 
vastly under-reported. There were several 
reasons noted for unreported usage.NFA hand- 
off instructional materials are often modified, 
frequently used only in part as a shorter program, 
and often assimilated into pre-existing state and 
local training curricula, in which the usage is not 
reported because the materials become a 
component of a different or larger course or 
program. 

While utilization of course packages as designed 
is recommended, it is recognized that training 
needs, resources and capabilities vary. It is the 
Academy's objective to provide training and 
educational materials which strengthen and 
supplement fire training at the state and local 





level. It is also the Academy's responsibility to 
demonstrate that these materials are being 
utilized. For this reason, it is important that 
participating agencies report material usage to the 
Academy. 

It is Academy policy that any significant usage of 
hand-off instructional materials in a training event 
is reportable as a "delivery". This includes such 
variations as teaching a component or unit 
of a hand-off course in a two-three hour training 
session, and using the material 
as components in the delivery 
of a different course (where the 
usage of hand-off course 
materials, visuals, slide-tapes, 
videos, and/or exercise 
materials makes an important 
or worthwhile contribution to 
the program). It is not 
necessary that all the material 
be used at any one time, or that 
it be used in any given 
sequence, to merit reporting as 
a "delivery". Any significant 
usage of hand-off course 
materials in support of existing 
state and local training 
programs is reportable to the 
Academy as a measure of 
utilization. 



YOU REQUEST 

STUDENT 

MANUALS 




YOU REPORT 
ON TRAINING 
PERFORMED 



It was stressed that only TtT Student Manual 
requests from authorized, eligible and 
participating agencies (i.e. State/Metros who 
participate in the annual NFA TtT program) will 
be honored. After initial shipments of manuals, 
agencies are monitored by NFA to ensure 
utiUzation before additional shipments are sent. 

It assists the Academy staff greatly when 
requests for Student Manuals are submitted on a 
quarterly basis. All planning, printing, stocking, 
and shipping activities are based on these 
quarterly requests. 



TRADE '86 Report 
13 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 



REFINING THE TRADE PROCESS 



In this session, all members of TRADE gathered 
in regional work groups to address ways and 
means of improving the TRADE process, 
network, and programs. Each regional work 
group was given three objectives: (1) to analyze 
recommendations for refinement; (2) to address 
the issue of accelerated hand-off of Field 
Programs Division course packages within one 
year of original pilot test; and (3) to address the 
issue of the delivery of Resident Programs 
Division courses in the TRADE regions. 

OBJECTIVE I: Analyze TRADE Net- 
work/ process and develop recommenda- 
tions for refinement 

Recommendations from the ten regions focused 
on two areas: (A) improving the TRADE 
networks/process; and (B) improving the Nation- 
al TRADE Conference. 

Improving TRADE Networks/ Process 

Attendees made 14 recommendations for im- 
proving the TRADE network/process. Of these, 
two recommendations were the strong concensus 
of all the regions. 

l.The Chief Executive Officers ( CEOs) and 
Training Officers should be included in future 
national/regional TRADE meetings/activities. 

2.Widespread information dissemination through 
various mediums should be accomplished. Some 
suggestions were to: 

• provide quarterly regional/national news- 
letter 

• develop public relations campaigns to adver- 
tise and publicize TRADE activities 

• provide overviews of TRADE activities 
through national publications 

• provide TRADE information packets at na- 
tional fireservice conferences 

• create an NF A/TRADE electronic bulletin 
board and electronic library data base 



Improving the TRADE Conference 

There was a strong concensus that the National 
TRADE Conference should be conducted 
annually. Additional recommendations for im- 
proving the national TRADE conference were: 

• attendance by CEO and Training Officer via 
stipend 

• invite media to attend/cover TRADE con- 
ference 

• limit conference contents to most current 
topics 

• provide more opportunity for extended dia- 
logue between state/metro systems 

• more emphasis on exchanging ideas/ re- 
sources 

• continue with TRADE-ing Post to include: 
Regional Training Resource Catalogues, 
schedule visual presentations, list available 
training materials in advance. 



[RECOMMENDATIONS 
FOR REFINING 

....THE TRADE PROCESS 

1. INCLUDE CEO'S AND 
TRAINING OFFICERS IN 
FUTURE NATIONAL AND 
REGIONAL MEETINGS. 

2. EMPHASIZE WIDESPREAD 
DISSEMINATION OF 
INFORMATION 

....THE NATIONAL 
CONFERENCE 

3. CONDUCT THE 
NATIONAL TRADE 
CONFERENCE 
ANNUALLY 



TRADE '86 Report 



14 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 



OBJECTIVE n: Address the issue of 
accelerated hand-off of Field Programs 
Division course packages within one 
year of original pilot test. 

The regional work groups were asked to 
articulate the advantages and disadvantages of 
accelerated hand-off of NFA course packages, 
and to make recommendations for the role that 
TRADE could play in such a program. 

Advantag es 

These advantages echo previous TRADE 
conference concerns regarding the time it takes 
NFA to develop, pilot-test, refine, and hand-off 
field courses. The first and most distinct 
advantage listed was that of saving time and 
money; specifically monies on adjunct faculty. 
Fewer pilots and field tests of courses would 
mean less money expended on adjunct contracts. 
Second, it was felt that "acceleration" of hand-off 
would put the courses in the user's hands in a 
more timely manner and would reduce/eliminate 
duplication of efforts by State/Metro, and NFA 
developers. Through this "cost-saving" 

recommendation, it is believed that a reallocation 
of financial resources from direct delivery to 
course development would allow for more 
courses to be developed and handed off 

Disadvantag es 

The most prominent disadvantage for accelerated 
handing-off of field courses was loss of quality. 
It was felt that with a reduced field test period, 
the quality of "finished" courses would be sac- 
rificed. This was based on the belief that an 
accelerated schedule would greatly diminish 
content fine-tuning and loss of deliveries now 
enjoyed at State/Metro level. As another 
disadvantage, it was agreed that the potential to 
overload existing delivery systems was very real. 
Also, it was noted that without additional staff 
resources the NFA could lose control and 
experience decline in quality of service to State 
and local delivery systems. 

Role of TRADE 

The predominant recommendation, insofar as 
TRADE'S role in the acceleration of hand-off 
courses, is to utiUze the TRADE network for its 
content expertise in the initial course development 
phase, followed up by pilot and regional TRADE 
field-testing. It is also the opinion of the TRADE 



groups that this could easily be accomplished on 
a "rotating" pilot-test basis from region-to- 
region, or to pilot-test at NFA with field tests 
limited to one per TRADE region. 

Included with this role would be the modular- 
ization of each course, coupled with regional in- 
put on trends and needs in the fire service on a 
regular basis. 

■ ^^ 

//. ACCELERATED HAND-OFF 



PROS,. 



COi\S.... 



ROLE OF 
TRADE.... 



" SAVE TIME AND 

MONEY 
*MORE TIMELY 

COURSES 

*LOSS OF QUALITY 
'OVERLOAD EXISTING 
DELTVERY SYSTEMS 

'DEVELOPMENTAL 
INPUT 

'REGIONAL FIELD- 
TESTING 



OBJECTIVE ni: Address the issues of 
the delivery of resident courses in the 
TRADE regions. 

Over the past several years, the interest level and 
number of requests for certain NFA resident 
courses to be conducted in the "field" have 
increased. The regional work groups were asked 
to address the issues of the delivery of resident 
courses in TRADE regions; specifically the 
advantages, disadvantages, consideration of the 
financial and resource support challenges and the 
Academy's role, the delivery format, and 
TRADE role. 

Advantages 

In review of the regional report-outs, the 
advantages were identified in three (3) categories. 
These are: 

• cost savings 

• expanded opportunities for student participa- 
tion 

• regional cooperation 



TRADE '86 Report 
15 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 



Under "cost savings," three distinct advantages 
include (1) the NFA paying all costs, thereby 
saving the State/Metro direct delivery costs, (2) 
reduced cost of stipends currently absorbed by 
the Academy for resident attendance, and (3) less 
expense to the student. 

Under "expanded opportunities for student par- 
ticipation," the focus was on the need to get more 
instructional materials and course deUvery 
opportunities out in the field; to increase the 
opportunity for student attendance in resident 
courses by State/Metro, and to put expertise on a 
given subject matter in the field that is not presen- 
tly available elsewhere. 

Advantages of "regional cooperation" were the 
broadest of the three categories, listing the 
following: reduction/elimination of NFA regis- 
tration/selection process; improvement of region- 
al cooperation/interaction; reinforcement of net- 
working; provision of regional focus; enhance- 
ment of public relations for NFA; and provision 
of latitude in scheduling. 

Disadvantag es 

As with the advantages, the disadvantages were 

also identified as being in three (3) general 

categories: 

• workload 

• learning environment 

• resotirces 

It was the consensus of the work groups that 
through any delivery of resident courses in the 
field, additional workloads would increase for 
NFA staff and for regional State and local 
training personnel who are already operating 
under heavy workloads. 

An important component of the learning environ- 
ment currently enjoyed at NFA is the national 
communication and interaction among students. 
Local or regional course deliveries would not be 
able to replicate this national melting pot of ideas 
and perspectives. The disadvantage of field 
delivery of resident courses would be the loss, to 
the student, of professional interaction and 
exchange of ideas within a national group of 
peers. 

There were several disadvantages posed by the 
problem of resources. Local deliveries would not 



have the benefit from the existing laboratiories 
and Learning Resource Center at NFA, so there 
would be some loss in the quality of instruction. 
Additional problems were the concern of poten- 
tial loss of student stipends for the "local" user, 
and the possibility of increased costs to state, 
local and NFA entities. 

Role of TRADE 

The considerations for financial and resource 
support challenges, NFA role, and delivery for- 
mat were all grouped under the role of TRADE 
considerations for the delivery of resident 
courses in the TRADE regions. 

The challenges/considerations in the financial/ 
resources area included (1) financial assistance to 
regions to cover costs of resident course 
delivery, (2) administrative and facility assistance 
(State and local), (3) stipends for local deliveries, 
(4) combination of resources of NFA and State 
systems to deliver courses, and (5) provisions to 
furnish instructional materials and instructors for 
field courses. 

"Delivery format" included regional support and 
coordination of cluster programs, delivery 
through the FPD, and maintenance of present 
quality. The specific consensus on the role of 
TRADE was "...assistance in selecting courses, 
scheduling, and instructor identification" 
followed by "...do not deliver resident courses in 
the field." 



///. DELIVERY OF RESIDENT 
COURSES IN REGIONS 



PROS. 



COiXS. 



ROLE OF 
TRADE.,.. 



'COST SAVINGS 
'EXPANDED 

OPPORTUNITIES 
'REGIONAL 

COOPERATION 

^WORKLOAD 
'LEARNING 

ENVIRONMENT 
'RESOURCES 

'COURSE SELECTION 
'SCHEDULING 
'INSTRUCTOR ID. 



TRADE '86 Report 
16 



Conference Sessions and Surveys 



ADDITIONAL SURVEYS 



STATE CERTIFICATION SURVEY 

During the TRADE Conference, a survey was 
conducted with the Directors of State Fire Service 
Training agencies to identify those states which 
use NFA-developed hand-off courses in State 
certification programs. This information is impor- 
tant to the Academy for program planning, as an 
indication of the quality of course content, and as 
a measure of utilization at the State and local 
level.The State Certification Matrix is located in 
the Appendix of this report. In summary, this 
survey's results indicated 25 States presently 
using Academy hand-off programs in 
certification programs, representing an increase 
of47% over 1985 levels. 



NUMBBU OF STATES 
USING NFA COURSE 
CERTrFJCATJON PROokaai^ 



47% INCREASE 
IN ONE YEAR 



17 




1985 1986 



TELECONFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE 

The results of the teleconference questionnaire 
provided interesting and important data for the 
Academy's future consideration in the use of 
teleconferencing as a mode of communications 
with and for the national TRADE organization. 

To highlight some of the more important 
elements of the questionnaire, we found that 97% 
of the respondents were receiving prebroadcast 



teleconference information; 68% of the respon- 
dents reported receiving the teleconferences 
direcdy or indirectly; 29% of the agencies have 
their own receiving stations (dishes) and 32% 
have plans to install receiving stations in the near 
future; fifty-five of the respondents reported that 
more than 12,000 personnel view the programs 
live or via videotape replay and 19 other agencies 
indicated that the teleconferences are received but 
could not provide an estimate of the number of 
personnel exposed to the programs. However, 
by the remarks, the numbers are expected to be 
rather large. 

Subjects and topics requested for future 
teleconferences include: fire department manage- 
ment, hazardous materials and hazardous 
materials safety, firefighter safety, wellness 
programs and fire service liabililty. Of the one 
hundred and fifty-seven participants in TRADE, 
only thirteen expressed skepticism about the use 
of teleconferencing as a means of communicating 
with the TRADE organizations, and only six felt 
that TRADE organizations did not have adequate 
access to receiving stations. A complete 
summary of questionnaire results can be found 
in the Appendix of this report. 



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DC O 

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RECEIVE K 
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TRADE '86 Report 
17 



TRADE '86 Report 
18 



Special Conference Events 




Special 

Conference 

Events 

The program for the 1986 National TRADE Con- 
ference provided a number of special Conference 
events and seminars in support of the objectives 
of TRADE and also marked important milestones 
in the history of the Academy. 

A highlight of the Conference was the oppor- 
tunity for the TRADE conference attendees to 
attend the ceremony for the swearing-in of 
new Superintendent William M. Neville, 
Jr. by General Julius W. Becton, Jr., 
Director of FEMA. The 1986 TRADE 
Conference also marked the inception of the 
National TRADE-ing Post, a unique and 
highly successful concept for furthering the 
exchange of ideas and exemplary programs 
among the TRADE network organizations. 
Another important program introduced in this 
year's conference was a series of seven 
special interest seminars selected by a 
planning committee of the TRADE co-chairs 
which addressed such topics as Women in the 
Fire Service and Fire Service Occupational Safety 
and Health Programs. A final activity capping 
the week's events was the TRADE banquet, 
which was an enjoyable opportunity for further 
interaction and discussion between TRADE par- 
ticipants, NFA staff, and FEMA Headquarters 
personnel. 



TRADE '86 Report 
19 



Special Conference Events 



New Superintendent at the 
National Fire Academy 



A highlight of TRADE '86 was the swearing-in 
of William M. Neville, Jr. as the superintendent 
of the National Fire Academy (NFA) on 
Thursday evening, December 4, 1986. 

Julius W. Becton, Jr., Director of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, administered 
the oath of office to Mr. Neville before the entire 
TRADE community plus friends, staff, and 
professional colleagues. 

In his remarks to the audience, Mr. Neville noted 
that "this is by far the most challenging, 
significant role I have ever undertaken." He 
believes that people who work outside the fire 
service have something valuable 
to offer and he intends to get 
them involved in the programs. 

Mr. Neville also praised the 
NFA staff for its dedication and 
for putting in many hours 
"beyond what is comfortable." 

As background, it should be 
noted that Mr. Neville helped 
coordinate the development of 
Fire Protection Master Planning 
for the U.S. Fire Administration 
and the NFA. He assisted in the 



implementation of several programs presented in 
America Burning, but said the job is not over by 
a long shot because "America is still burning." 

Mr. Neville had been Chief of Hayward, 
California, Fire Department since 1980 and had 
previously served more than 23 years with the 
Los Angeles City Fire Department. 

The faculty and staff of the National Fire 
Academy are pleased with the appointment of 
William Neville and look forward, with renewed 
energy, to dedicating themselves to providing 
high caliber educational opportunities to the 
Nation's fire and rescue service community. 




William M. Neville, Jn 
Superintendent 
National Fire Academy 



TRADE '86 Report 
20 



Special Conference Events 



TRADE-ing Post 



Billed as the most unique shopping mart for fire 
service trainers in the country, exemplary training 
programs from throughout the Nation were on 
display in an exhibit-hall atmosphere during the 
evenings. The exhibit featured materials devel- 
oped by state fire training programs and major 
fire departments from across the nation, selected 
FEMA offices, and continuous showings of 
exemplary audio-visual programs. 

Conceived during the TRADE Conference Plan- 
ning Meeting, this was the first time that the 
National Fire Academy had undertaken such an 
event. TRADE-ing Post exhibits had to be 
training/education-related or have signifi-cance to 
the missions of State/Metro fire training agencies. 
No commercial vendors were invited. 

Many innovative programs were "shared" in both 
printed and audio-visual formats. Examples in- 
cluded: 

A. Newly developed training manuals/courses. 

B. Recently identified "region exemplary 
packages". 

C. Videotape and slide/tape presentations about 
organizations which exhibited new ideas, 
training efforts resulting in improved safety 
techniques, actual footage from emergency 
scenes, etc. 



EXHIBIT REQUIREMENTS...^ 



*TRAININGAND 

EDUCATION 

RELATED 



'SIGNIFICANT TO 
MISSIONS OF THE 
TRAINING AGENCIES 

'NO COMMERCIAL 
VENDORS 



'\ 



KINDS OF EXHIBITS.,.. 

'SAMPLES OF COURSE 
MANUALS 

'EXEMPIwXRY 
CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES 

'VIDEO AND SLIDE-TAPE 
PRESENTATIONS 

'HAND OUT 
DESCRIPTIONS OF 
INNOVATIVE 
TRAINING APPROACHES 

'DISPLAY BOARDS AND 
SIGN-UP SHEETS 



D. One-page descriptions of innovative approach- 
es used to solve training challenges, descrip- 
tions of training activities/calendars, etc. 

E. Display boards as used at state fire 
conferences and meetings. 

F. Sign-up sheets to get copies of "one only" 
display items (orders were taken for back- 
home mail out of exemplary programs that 
were too large to have been stocked in a 
regional booth). 

In addition to individual State/Metro exhibits 
presented on a regional basis, a number of 
National Emergency Training Center program 
offices participated, including the National Fire 
Academy, Emergency Management Institute, 
Office of Programs and Academics; U.S. Fire 
Administration; Media Production Center; 
Learning Resource Center, and the Office of 
Admissions. Envisioned as a "show and tell," 
the TRADE-ing post also included displays from 
the Armed Services and the National Wildfire 
Coordinating Group. 

TRADE '86 Report 
21 



Special Conference Events 



Special Interest Seminar Report 



The TRADE Planning Committee chose Special 
Interest Seminars to be presented during the 
conference. The topics for these seminars were 
selected on the basis of national concern. The 
seven individual subjects identified for seminar 
presentation were: 

-Incident Command System (ICS) 

-Fire Service Occupational Safety and 
Health Programs (NFPA 1500-1501) 

-Live Fire Training Evolutions in 
Structures (NFPA 1403) 

-Employee Assistance Programs 

-Integrated Emergency Management 
System (lEMS) 

-Women in the Fire Service 

-Marine Firefighting 

The Academy appreciates the spirit, profes- 
sionalism and willingness displayed by the 
workshop presenters who were a part of the 
TRADE conference. They had approximately 
three to four weeks to plan their presentations, 
and in almost every case, the presenters had to 
communicate with a co-presenter strictly via 
telephone. For anyone who has not had this 



Women in the 
Fire Service 

48% 



20% 



m- 

v-.!^'.^ 



44 Total 
Responses 



Exc 



Good Fair 



Poor 



challenge, it is not an easy task; especially if one 
has never met his/her co-presenter. Given this 
situation, the evaluations indicated 79% of the 
workshop attendees were pleased with the 
workshops while 21% did not feel the work- 
shops were of the quality they expected or that 
the content of the workshops did not address 
their particular areas of interest. 

There was significant participant interest in Fire 
Service Occupational Safety and Health 
Programs (NFPA 1500-1501) and in Live Fire 
Training Evolutions in Structures (NFPA 1403) . 
53% of the attendees attended these two 
workshops. Women in the Fire Service drew 
17% of the attendees and ICS also drew 15% of 



Fire Service 

Occupational Safety 

and Health Programs 

(NFPA 1500-1501) 



60% 



13% 



§<^^"^ '^^ 



71 Total 
Responses 



23% 



4% 



Exc Good Fair Poor 



Incident 
Command System 

63% 



39 Total 
Responses 



Exc Good Fair Poor 




TRADE '86 Report 
22 



Special Conference Events 



the attendees. Collectively, these four work- 
shops attracted 85% of all attendees. With this 
data, an assumption could be drawn that topics 
relating to operations and training are of top 
interest. However, with the strong interest for 
the Women in the Fire Service workshop, it is 
difficult to determine if the interest was due to 



operations and training or administrative/ 
management reasons. For whatever reasons the 
majority of attendees were attracted to the four 
identified workshops, the next TRADE Planning 
Committee will have a good idea of what subjects 
should be selected for future workshops. 



Employee Assistance 
Programs 




Live Fire Training 

Evolutions in Structures 

(NFPA1403) 



50 ■■ 
40 ■■ 
30 ■■ 
20 ■■ 

10 ■■ 

■- 



70% 



18% 



67 Total 
Responses 



7% 



5% 



Exc Good Fair Poor 



Integrated Emergency 
Management Systems 



72% 



0% 



18 Total 
Responses 



22% 



6% 



Marine 



Fireflghting 



Exc 



+ 
Good Fair Poor 



12 Total 
■ ■ Responses 



25% 



50% 



?^r. 17% 



\ /» ;^ FBTTS^ 



Exc Good Fair Poor 



Overall Evaluation of All Seminars 

60% 



■ 


19 % 








262 Total 
Responses 

16 % 


■ 


^^>---\i^^; f' ■ 


— 1 — 


— 1 — 


""""5? 


5 % 



Exc 



Good 



Fair 



Poor 



TRADE '86 Report 



23 



Special Conference Events 



TRADE Banquet 



TRADE participants were treated to an 
outstanding meal on Thursday evening which 
followed a social hour of relaxed and informal 
discussions with each other, several honored 
guests, and members of the FEMA staff. 
Following the banquet, introduction of the 
persons seated at the head table was made. This 
group included Julius W. Becton, Jr., FEMA 
Director, who was also the main speaker; Robert 
H. Morris, FEMA Deputy Director; William C. 
Tidball, FEMA Chief of Staff; Kristen L. Seeger, 
FEMA Deputy Chief of Staff; James P. McNeill, 
Associate Director for Training and Fire 
Programs; Caesar A. Roy, Deputy Associate 
Director For Training and Fire 
Programs; William M. Neville, 
Jr., newly swom-in National Fire 
Academy Superintendent; Joseph 
E. Clark, National Technical 
Information Service Deputy 
Director and former Acting 
Administrator of the U.S. Fire 
Administration; Louis J. Amabili, 
Delaware State Fire School 



Director and former member of the National 
Commission on Fire Prevention and Control; 
Edward J. Kaplan, TRADE Project Officer; and 
Timothy May, Master of Ceremonies. 

Upon conclusion of his remarks, Director Becton 
introduced Superintendent Neville who recalled 
several important passages from the report, 
America Burning, concerning the importance and 
critical need for a National Fire Academy. 
Master of Ceremonies May ensured that all in 
attendance enjoyed a relaxed and light-hearted 
banquet program. 




Julius W. Becton, Jr. 

Director 

Federal Emergency Managment Agency 



TRADE '86 Report 



24 



Appendices 



Appendices 



Acknowledgement of Conference Planners and Presenters 27 

List of Attendees 28 

FEMA Five- Year Curriculum Plan Survey Results35 

NFA Curriculum Survey Results43 

Teleconference Survey Results 68 

State Certification Program MatrixVl 

Sample: Request for Student Manuals Form 72 

Sample: Course Information Data Postcard74 



TRADE '86 Report 

25 



Appendix 



TRADE '86 Report 
26 



Appendix: Acknowledgement of Conference Planners and Presenters 



Acknowledgements 



CO-CHAIR CONFERENCE PLANNING GROUP 

Wayne Sandford Director, Fire Training and Education, Commission on Fire Prevention and Control, 

Connecticut Region I 
Renzy Hanshaw Director, Training and Education, Office of Fire Prevention and Control, New York State 

Department of State Region II 
Nick Finnamore Col., Prince Georges County Fire Department Training Academy, Upper Marlboro, 

Maryland Region III 
James O. Bates Training Officer, City of Tampa Fire Department, Florida Region N 
Gerald Monigold Director, Illinois Fire Service Institute, University of Illinois Region V 
Robert S. Cassaday Executive Deputy Chief, Fort Worth Fire Department, Texas Region VI 
James C. Dill Chief of Training Academy, Kansas City Fire Department, Missouri Region VII 
Thomas J. Sanborn Coordinator, Fire Service Training, Pierre, South Dakota Region VIII 
James L. McFadden Fire Academy Administrator, Resources Agency of California, Department of 

Forestry, Fire Academy Region IX 
John Anderson Director, Washington State Fire Service Training, Olympia, Washington Region X 

CONFERENCE PRESENTERS 

William Peterson Chief , Piano Fire Department, Piano TX 

Live Fire Training Evolutions in Structures: NFPA 1403 
Garnet Schenk Chief Instructor, Ontario Fire College, Ontario Canada 

Live Fire Training Evolutions in Structures: NFPA 1403 
Robert Barnard, Ph.D. Washington State Fire Service Training, Olympia WA 

Marine Firefighting 
Mike Foley Instructor, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 

Marine Firefighting 
Michael Franchini Lt., U.S. Coast Guard, Headquarters, Washington, D.C. 

Marine Firefighting 
Darl McBride Battalion Chief, Washington D.C. Fire Department 

Fire Service Occupational Sc^ety and Health Programs and Fire Department Sctfety Officer 
Requirements: NFPA 1500-1502 
Gordon Routley Asst. to the Chief, Phoenix Fire Dept, AZ 

Fire Service Occupational Scrfety and Health Programs and Fire Department Scifety Officer 
Requirements: NFPA 1500-1501 
James L. McFadden Administrator, California Department of Forestry Training Academy, 

lone, CA Incident Command System (ICS) 
Steve Brown Chief, Butte County Fire Department, CA 

Incident Command System (ICS) 
Dennis Compton Assistant Chief, Phoenix Fire Department, AZ 

Employee Assistance Programs 
Elizabeth Jackson Redding Firefighter, Prince Georges County Fire Department, MD 

Employee Assistance Programs 
Philip McDonald Emergency Management Institute, FEMA 

Integrated Emergency Management System (lEMS) 
Paul Boecker Chief, Lisle- Woodridge Fire Department, Lisle, IL 

Integrated Emergency Managment System (lEMS) 
Lynn Oliver Chief, Mercer Island Fire Department, WA 

Women in the Fire Service 
Rose Conroy Captain, Davis Fire Department, CA 

Women in the Fire Service 
Harry Diezel Chief, Virginia Beach Fire Department, VA 
Women in the Fire Service 

TRADE '86 Report 

27 



Appendix: List of Attendees 



1986 National TRADE Conference 
Participating Organizations and Attendees 



Region I 



Organization 



CONNECTICUT 



Attendee 





New Haven Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Matthew J. Lyons 




Hartford Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Thomas Williams 


# 


Connecticut Fire Training and Education 


Director Wayne Sandford (TRADE Co-Chair) 


MAINE 


# 


Maine Fire Training and Education 


Deputy Administrator John Nadeau (TRADE Co-Chaii)| 


* Administrator Stephen Hasson 


MASSACHUSETTS 




Boston Fire DeparUnent 


Deputy Chief Nino Tramontozzi 




Springfield Fire Department 


Chief Raymond Sullivan 


# 


Massachusetts Fire Academy 


Deputy Director Fred Piechota 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 




Manchester Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Peter DeNutte (TRADE Co-Chair) 


# 


New Hampshire State Fire Training 


Chief Joseph Kane 


RHODE ISLAND 




Providence Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Gilbert McLaughlin 


# 


Rhode Island Fire Academy 


Director Ronald Jones 


VERMONT 


l# 


Vermont Firefighters Association 


Assistant Supervisor George S. Gibby 



Region n 



Organization 
NEW JERSEY 



Attendee 



Jersey City Fire Department 


Deputy Chief George Milne 


*Chief John Mullins 


# New Jersey Fire Safety 


Assistant Supervisor August Brummer 


NEW YORK 


Buffalo Fire Department 


Battalion Chief Alfred Mehltretter 


Fire Department City of New York 


Director Donald Bums 


Rochester Fire DeparUnent 


Deputy Chief Lawrence Peters 


Nassau County Fire Academy 


InsQ-uctor Thomas Rahilly 


Suffolk County Fire Academy 


Deputy Director James Johnson 


Syracuse bat DeparUnent 


Deputy Chiet James Mitson 


# New York hire FrevenUon and Control 


Director Kenzy Hanshaw (IRADE Co-Chair) 



# State Fire Service Training Agency 

* Secondary Attendee 



TRADE '86 Report 

28 



Appendix: List of Attendees 



Organization 
DELAWARE 



Region m 

Attendee 



# Delaware State Fire School 



Director Louis Amabili 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



District of Columbia Fire Department 



Deputy Chief Philip Matthews 



MARYLAND 



Anne Arundel County Fire Department 



Captain Ronald Biermann 



Baltimore City Fire Department 



Chief Thomas Baginski 



Baltimore County Fire Department 



Deputy Chief Thomas Caltrider 



Montgomery County Fire/Rescue Services 



Training Officer Mary Beth Michos 



Prince Georges County Fire Department 



Lt. Col. Nicholas Finamore (TRADE Co-Chair) 
* Maj. Frank Colea 



# Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute 



Director John Hoglund 



PE NN SYI .V A NT A 



Riiladelphia Fire Department 



Director James Meskill 



Pittsburgh Fire Department 



Deputy Chief John Moran 



# Pennsylvania State Fire School 



Co-Administrator David Witmer 
* Administrator Robert Grening 



VIRGINIA 




Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department 


Lt. Michael Neuhard 

* Battalion Chief Charles Rose 


Norfolk Fire Division 


Fire Marshal Carl Welch 


Richmond Bureau of Fire 


Training Officer Thomas Edwards 


Virginia Beach Fire Department 


Battalion Chief James Kellam 



WEST VIRGINIA 



Charleston Fire Department 



Chief Ira Gunter 

* Deputy Chief Raymond DeBolt 



# West Virginia Fire Service Extension 



Program Leader Everett Perkins 



Organization 

ALABAMA 



Region FV 

Attendee 



Mobile Fire Department 



Battalion Chief Stephen Dean 



# Alabama State Fire College 



Director Robert Hagler 
* Coordinator Robert Nix 



# State Fire Service Training Agency 

* Secondary Attendee 



TRADE '86 Report 
29 



Appendix: List of Attendees 


FLORIDA 


Metro-Dade County Fire Department 


Coordinator James Fitzgerald 


Palm Beach County Fire and Rescue 


Division Chief John Sluth 


Tallahassee Fire Department 


Department Chief John Roberts 


City of Miami Fire Department 


Training Chief Donald Joyce 


Orange County Fire Department 


Battalion Chief Frank Montes d'Oca 


Tampa Fire Department 


Division Chief James Stokes 


# Florida State Fire College 


Bureau Chief Fred Stark (TRADE Co-Chair) 
* Administrator Elianne Sorel 


GEORGIA 


Atlanta Public Safety/Bureau of Fire 


Chief Training Officer Charlie Duncan 


DeKalb County Fire Department 


Deputy Director Scott Wilder 


Fulton County Fire Department 


Battalion Chief Ted Chupp 

* Battalion Chief Gene Holbrook 


Gwinnett County Fire Service 


Chief Training Officer Steve Bowles 


KENTUCKY 


Louisville Division of Fire 


Chief Training Officer Roy Higdon 


# Kentucky State Vo-Ed Training 


Coordinator Jack Trautwein 


MISSISSIPPI 


# Mississippi Fire Academy 


Coordinator William Warren 


NORTH CAROLINA 


Charlotte Fire Department 


Supervisor Francis Killian 


* Deputy Chief Howard Wilson 


# North Carolina Fire Training Services 


Director Ken Farmer 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


# South Carolina Fire Academy 


Director Joseph McDonagh 


TENNESSEE 


Memphis Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer James Fleming 


Chattanooga Fire Department 


Chief Marvin Day 



Organization 
ILLINOIS 



Region V 

Attendee 



Chicago Fire Department 


Director George Malik 


# Illinois Fire Service Institute 


Director Gerald Monigold (TRADE Co-Chair) 


INDIANA 


Indianapolis Fire Department 


Deputy Director David Cutshaw 


# Indiana State Fire Training 


Director Stanley Gibson 


MICHIGAN 


Detroit Fire Department 


Administrator John Reardon (TRADE Co-Chair) 


# Michigan Firefighter Training 


Executive Secretary Richard Powell 


# State Fire Service Training Agency 

* Secondary Attendee 


TRADE '86 Report 



30 



Appendix: List of Attendees 


MINNESOTA 


Minneapolis Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Ray Luniewski 


St. Paul Fire Department 


Training Officer Gary Skoglund 


# Minnesota Fire and Education 


Training Coordinator William Bruen 


OfflO 


Cincinnati Fire Department 


Battalion Chief Bernard Klaene 


Columbus Division of Fire 


Chief William Brobst 


Dayton Fire Department 


Battalion Chief Tommy Milam 


Toledo Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Robert Schwanzl 


Akron Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Ralph Schueller 


# Ohio Fire Academy 


Superintendent Gregory Drew 


WISCONSIN 


# Wisconsin Fire Education and Training 


Chief John Fulcher 



Organization 
ARKANSAS 



Region VI 

Attendee 



# Arkansas Fire Academy 


Director Sheldon Richardson (TRADE Co-Chair) 


LOUISIANA 


Shreveport Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer Dan Gotten 


Jefferson Parish Fire Academy 


Director George Martinsen 


# LSU Fireman Training Program 


Department Head Thomas Hebert 


NEW MEXICO 


# New Mexico Fire Marshal's Office 


Director Bob Baca 


OKLAHOMA 


Oklahoma City Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer Tom Baggs 


Tulsa Fire Department 


Chief Fred Cotton 


# Oklahoma Fire Service Training 


Coordinator Glenn Pribbenow 


TEXAS 


Austin Fire Department 


Division Chief Thomas Anderson 


Dallas Fire Deparunent 


Deputy Chief James Zak 


El Paso Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer Johnny Dunn 


Fort Worth Fire Department 


Executive Deputy Chief Robert Cassady 

(TRADE Co-Chair) 
♦Executive Deputy Chief Robert Gibson 


Houston Fire Department 


Deputy Chief David Fuller 


Arlington Fire Department 


Lt. Robert Bennett 


Corpus Christi Fire Department 


Battalion Chief Walter Jones 


# Texas Fire Protection Training 


Division Chief Thomas Foster 



# State Fire Service Training Agency 

* Secondary Attendee 



TRADE '86 Report 
31 



Appendix: List of Attendees 



Organization 
IOWA 



Region VII 

Attendee 



Des Moines Fire Department 


Captain Larry Fogelson 


# Fire Service Institute 


Administrator Keith Royer 


KANSAS 


# Kansas Fire Service Training 


Administrator John Wolf 


MISSOURI 


Kansas City Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer James Dill 


St. Louis Fire Department 


Chief Neil Svetanics 


# Missouri Fire and Rescue Training 


Director Bruce R. Piringer (TRADE Co-Chair) 


NEBRASKA 


# Nebraska Fire Service 


Manager Bob Vogltance 
♦Director Russ Daly 



Organization 
COLORADO 



Region VHI 

Attendee 





Colorado Springs Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer Ervin Meachum 




Denver Fire Department 


Captain Charles Chase 


# 


Colorado Fire Safety Division 


Director Dean Smith 


MONTANA 




Bilhngs Fire Department 


Training Officer Myron Papke 


# 


Montana Fire Services Training School 


Director Seldon Weedon 


NORTH DAKOTA 




Fargo Fire Department 


Director Loren Piersall 


# 


North Dakota Fireman's Association 


Executive Secretary Donald Oilman 


SOUTH DAKOTA 




Sioux Falls Fire Department 


Training Officer Kirk Anderson 


# 


South Dakota Fire Safety Division 


Director Thomas Sanborn (TRADE Co-Chair) 
♦Captain James Tish (Rapid City, SD -- adjunct) 


UTAH 




Salt Lake City Fire Department 


Chief Peter Pederson 
♦Training Officer Jefferey Rylee 




Salt Lake County Fire Department 


Chief Shirl Maxfield 
♦Training Officer Howard Meik 


# 


Utah State Fire Training 


Director Gordon Evans 



# State Fire Service Training Agency 

* Secondary Attendee 



TRADE '86 Report 
32 



Appendix: List of Attendees 


WYOMING 


Casper Fire Department 


Chief Ronald Baum 


# Wvoming Fire Marshall's Office 


Chief Training Officer Scott Schein 



Organization 
ARIZONA 



Region IX 

Attendee 



Mesa Fire Department 


Captain Dennis Rubin 


Phoenix Fire Department 


Deputy Chief George Dodd 


Rural-Metro Fire Department, Inc. 


Director Jim Hartsfield 


Tucson Fire Department 


Deputy Chief John Nunes (TRADE Co-Chair) 


# Arizona Fire Marshal's Office 


Training Officer Herb Hoey 


CALIFORNIA 


Kem County Fire Department 


Training Officer Courtenay Oxford 


Ventura County Fire Department 


Chief Wesley Kilcrease 


San Bernardino County Fire Academy 


Division Chief Robert Munsey (TRADE Co-Chair) 


City of Fresno Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Dennis Rohde 


California Department of Forestry 


Chief James McFadden 


Long Beach Fire Department 


Director Marvin Rupe 


Orange County Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Robert Hennessey 


San Diego Fire Department 


Deputy Chief George George 


San Francisco Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Edward Phipps 


Santa Ana Fire Department 


Coordinator Bob Baker 


# California Fire Marshal's Office 


Manager Ken Wagner (TRADE Co-Chair) 


HAWAn 


Maui Fire Control 


Deputy Chief Gunichi Matsuoka 
(representing Honolulu) 


NEVADA 


Las Vegas Fire Department 


Deputy Chief Rex Shelbume 


# Nevada Fire Marshal's Office 


Director William Colescott 



Organization 
ALASKA 



Region X 

Attendee 



Anchorage Fire Department 


Deputy Chief John Fullenwider 


# Alaska Fire Service Training 


Supervisor Leigh Gallagher 


IDAHO 




Boise Fire Department 


Director Alan Walker 



# State Fire Service Training Agency 

* Secondary Attendee 



TRADE '86 Report 
33 



Appendix: List of Attendees 


OREGON 




Portland Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer Ronald Bender 


# Oregon Fire Marshal's Office 


Director Lee Ann Janusch 


WASHINGTON 


Seattle Fire Department 


Chief Training Officer Roger Ramsey 
(TRADE Co-chair) 


# Washington Fire Service Training 


Administrator John Anderson (TRADE Co-Chair) 
♦Supervisor William Barnard 



Organization 



U.S. MILITARY REPRESENTATIVES 

Attendee 



U.S. Marine Corps 


Albert Kirchner 


U.S. Air Force 


Donald Madden 


U.S. Coast Guard 


Steve Souder 



# State Fire Service Training Agency 

* Secondary Attendee 



TRADE '86 Report 

34 



Appendix: FEMA 5- Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 



FEMA FIVE-YEAR CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN 
SURVEY RESULTS 

Procedures Used To Gather Information 

All members of TRADE were briefed on FEMA's mandate to develop a Five- Year Curriculum 
Management Plan and on NFA's commitment to use TRADE (and other fire service organizations) to 
get the most accurate information about fire service training needs throughout the country. Participants 
were then briefed on the worksheets they would be filling out. 

Each region divided into small groups to answer the worksheet questions. Some regions had as many 
as four small groups and some as few as two groups. Due to time constraints and the complexity of 
the questions, not all groups answered all questions. Groups were given 20 minutes to list the top 
trends likely to affect the Fire service over the next five years and tnen 20 minutes to Ust the most 
serious performance problems. They were then given 45 minutes to discuss the training impact of the 
trends and 45 minutes to discuss the training impact of the performance problems. Training impact 
included target audiences, skills needed, content, and recommendations. 

The final question related to the type of input TRADE members would like to have into the curriculum 
management planning process. "Most regions kept this worksheet for several days in order to have 
time to discuss their answers. 







# OF GROUPS 
REPORTING 


RATED TOP 


TREND 


TRAINING NEEDS 


PRIORITY 


1. Increased competition 


Accounting 


7 


6 


for financial resources; 


Math 






reduced financial 


Short- and long-range 






resources 


planning 
Budget systems 
Lobby, communication, 

political savvy, selling 
Computer applications 














in budget process 






2. Increased use of 


Impact of standards on 


5 


2 


standards, regulations; 
external regulations of 


fiscal priorities and 






programs 
How to meet the intent 






fire service 








of standards 








What the standard-making 








process involves for 








various agencies 








How to impact the standard- 








making process 








How to serve on standard 








committees 








Strategies for interagency 








cooperation 






3. Implementation of 
Safety Standards 


Safety program development 

Recordkeeping 

Responsibility/authority 


5 













issues 








Awareness of standards 
Impact of standards on 














fiscal priorities and 








programs 







TRADE '86 Report 

Is 



Appendix: FEMA 5- Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 



TREND 



TRAINING NEEDS 



# OF GROUPS 
REPORTING 



RATED TOP 
PRIORITY 



4. Broader use of 
computer technology 



5. Increased emphasis 
on wellness and nealth 
issues 



6. Standardization of 
Professional Standards 

7. Increased emphasis 
on safety 



8. Greater fire 
department 
responsibility for 
hazardous materials 



9. Increased litigation 
involving the fire 
service 



10. Emphasis on 
accountabiUty, 
productivity 

11. Increased use of 
media 

12. Importance of polit- 
ical arena 

13. Regionalization of 
fire service functions 
and services 



14. Greater responsibility 
being placed on first-line 
supervisor 

15. Delivery changes 
for training 



Conceptual skills 
Problem identification 
Interpreting statistics 
Computer capabilities 
Hardware/software; data 
base programs 

Stress management 
Substance abuse and 

intervention 
Interpersonal and 

listening skills 
Wellness and fitness 

program development 

Training seared to NFPA 
standards 

Hazard analysis 
Policy development 
Identification, mitigation 
of hazards 
Liability issues 

Planning 
Prevention 
Mitigation 
Resource awareness 
Response procedures 

Liability issues 
Incident documentation 

procedures 
Court process 
Firefighter safety/survival 
Legal action/affirmative 

action 

Work force management 



Training resources in video 
medium 

Infiuencing public officials 



Purchasing 
Communication 
Legal issues 
Management 



Planning 

Facilitating 

Organizing 



TRADE '86 Report 



36 





Appendix: FEMA 5- Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 


TREND 


TRAINING NEEDS 


# OF GROUPS 
REPORTING 


RATED TOP 
PRIORITY 


16. Upward mobility of 
women 




1 





17. Increased speciali- 
zation of fire service 
personnel 




1 





18. Privatization of 
the fire service 








19. Reduced human 
resources 


Communication 
Resource management 
Lobbying 


1 





20. Demand for public 
fire education 


Communication 

Codes 

Public relations 

Resource management 






21. Higher education 
prerequisites for 
officers in hiring 
and promotion 


Management 
Supervision 


1 






Training Recommendations For Top Five Trends 

1. Increased Competition for Financial Resources; Reduced Financial Resources 

NFA seminars/workshops on fiscal management (4) 

Encourage use of higher education at local colleges and universities (4) 

Attend TRADE conferences (1) 

NFA to develop video (1) 

Attend workshops through associations of counties, similar sources (1) 

Courses on poUcy-making, municipal finance (no developer listed) Q) 

Develop a course on fire nsk management for the public, elected officials, and chief executives (1) 

2. Increased Use of Standards, External Regulation of Fire Service 

NFA to develop package (2) 

Need National State, local level training (1) 

NFA, EMI, NFPA furnish standard procedure (1) 

3. Implementation Of Safety Standards 

Firefighter Safety and Survival Course TtT (1) 
NFA,1CMA, OSHA (1) 

4. Broader Use Of Computer Technology 
College, university, and vendor training (1) 

5. Increased Emphasis on Wellness and Health Issues 

Video program by NFA (1) 

NFA courses on fitness and on substance abuse (1) 

Identify existing educational programs (1) 

Seek the assistance of the medical community (1) 

NFA Resident and Field courses on firefighter safety and welfare (1) 

Identify existing support organizations (1) 



TRADE '86 Report 
37 



Appendix: FEMA 5-Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 



PERFORMANCE 
PROBLEMS 



TRAINING NEEDS 



# OF GROUPS 
REPORTING 



RATED TOP 
PRIORITY 



1 . Inability to 
effectively implement 
and/or supply super- 
visory management 
principles (at incidents) 

(Company officer 
ineffectiveness) 
(Inadequate manage- 
ment, supervisory 
skills) 

2. Inability to 
understand Human 
Resource Management 
(non-fireground) 



3. Insufficient tactical 
experience 



4. Company officer 
needs more training 
as a trainer (TtT) 



5. Failure to prepare 
for administrative 
responsibilities 



6. Fireground Safety 



7. Unwillingness to 
accept responsibility 



Communication and 
all basic management 
and supervisory skills 



Personnel management, 

interpersonal skills 
Listening 
Labor relations 
Motivational techniques 

Employee assistance program 
Communication skills 
Time management skills 
Ability to delegate 
Recognizing personnel needs 
Counseling 

Fireground and leadership 

ability 
Ability to communicate 
Fireground strategy and 

tactics 
How to apply tactics to various 

situations 

(Not spelled out) 



Budget formulation 

and justification 
Compliance to standards 
Impact of local. State, 

and Federal standards 
Marketing policy 
Decision-making 
Long-range planning 

skifls 
Performance competency 

Physical fitness 
Knowledge of job, 

safety equipment, 

and standards 
Importance of safety 
How to develop and 

administer a safety and 

physical fitness program 
Hazard recognition and 

identification 

Management skills 

Leadership 

Training 



10 



TRADE '86 Report 
38 



Appendix: FEMA 5- Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 



PERFORMANCE 
PROBLEMS 



TRAINING NEEDS 



# OF GROUPS 
REPORTING 



RATED TOP 
PRIORITY 



8. Failure of fire 
officers to fully 
implement safety 
policy 



9. Inability to evaluate 
employee performance 



10. Inability to 
communicate 



1 1. Failure by company 
officer to enforce policy 



12. Inability due to 
time constraints to 
offer intradepartment 
training for officers 

13. Inability of the fire 
service to market itself and 
to enlist support of political 
entities 

14. Inability to internally 
develop personnel to levels 
of competency desired. 

15. Failure to support and 
set the proper example/double 
standard 

16. Failure to implement an 
incident command system 

17. Inter/Intra department 
communications are lacking 

18. Inability of present 
instructors to relate with 
"media" generation 



Understanding rules and 

regulations 
How to implement 

corrective action 

Awareness of possibiHties 

of omission 
Understanding procedures, 

such as OSHA regulations 
Techniques for implementing 

compliance 
Benefits of safe working 

environment 

Interpersonal skills 
Listening 
Task analysis 
Performance evaluation 

Ability to communicate 
verbally and in writing 

Training in writing 
reports 

Communications and 

attitude adjustment 
Organizational structure 

and responsibilities 

Management skills 

Communications 

Leadership 



TRADE '86 Report 
39 



Appendix: FEMA 5- Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 



Training Recommendations For Top Five Performance Problems 

1. Inability To Effectively Implement And/Or Apply Supervisory Management Principles (At 
Incidents) 

We need a change in attitude of the officer to realize that his/her most important job is the 

development of people under him/her (1) 
Case study resource bank (2) 

Teleconferences; field and resident programs; contract with local or regional institutions (1) 
Experience at pre-command levels; leadership training; college, NFA or local (1) 
Introduce current courses to lower ranks (drivers/operators); NFA hand-off courses presented 

locally before promotion to supervisory position (l) 
Teach application of basic principles by NFA resident program (role playing) (1) 

2. Inability To Understand Human Resource Management (Non-Fireground) 

Video program (2) 

TtT hand-off, lesson plan, video (1) 



TtT- one-day, multi-media, self-study course (1) 
College courses to deal with these problems (2) 



NFA TtT on interpersonal skills; information on how to contact local agencies (2) 
NFA hand-off course; local law enforcement assistance (1) 
NFA develop resident and field program (2) 
ICMA, universities, NFA (1) 
TtT Increasing Personal and Team Effectiveness (1) 

Develop course to impact attitudes and behavior of the fire service manager (1) 
Remove "volunteer" from VFSM course; develop mid-management course level m and IV 
NFPA 1021; use actual firehouse incidents, real world; use NFA discipline code (1) 

3. Insufficient Tactical Experience 

NFA Field (TtT); videotapes to support State and local courses; NFA resident (2) 
Local, State, colleges, NFA field hand-off (1) 

4. Failure To Prepare for the Administrative Responsibilities of the Job 

Seek and utilize recognized budgetary/fiscal managers and educators to present resident programs 

and telecasts (1) 
Use local colleges; sponsor local seminars; require municipal officials to attend with fire officers; 

have chiefs bnng their fire department policymakers to seminar for joint planning and 

training (1) 
Preparation of the program for hand-off for local use (1) 

5. Lack Of Commitment To Safety And Physical Fitness 

Videos; TtT hand-off of field programs; development of safety officers (1) 
Modular, packaged program with video (1) 
NFA hand-off package (1) 

Stress management courses, seminars, workshops, and video programs (1) 
Build motivation for use of safety procedures (1) 

Frequent review of Firefighter Safety and Survival; NFA develop model physical fitness program 
for hand-off to States and Metros (1) 



TRADE '86 Report 

40 



Appendix: FEMA 5- Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 

Regional Ability To Participate In Five- Year Curriculum 
Management Planning Process 

Nineteen worksheets were turned in. Six regions turned in one worksheet for the entire region, three 
regions turned in two worksheets each, and one region had individuals fill out the worksheets for their 
own Metro area or State. One individual left the worksheet blank, saying he was unable to make a 
commitment at this time. 




Would your region be willing and 
able to verify job/task analyses 
provided by NFA? 



13 



4 

Kt-V.V.WV-v. 



YES 



YES 

WITH 
CONDITIONS 



MAYBE NO 



Would your region be willing and 
able to ask your fire service 
personnel to complete job/task 
analyses? 



^\. 




f- •' 



YES 



YES 

WITH 
CONDITIONS 



MAYBE NO 





10 




5 


















^ '■ 




3 











YES YES MAYBE NO 

WITH 
CONDITIONS 



^ 



Would your region be willing and 
able to send a representative to 
NFA to participate in a working 
group which would analyze 
curriculum? 



TRADE '86 Report 
41 



Appendix: FEMA 5- Year Curriculum Management Plan Survey 



Would your region be willing 
and able to review curriculum 
working group reports and provide 
feedback to NFA in a timely 
fashion? 



16 



_E 



YES YES MAYBE 

WITH 
CONDITIONS 



NO 




Would your region be willing to 
provide the name, address, and 
telephone number of a contact 
person for questions about NFA 's 
development of a five-year 
curriculum? 



^ 



15 



^'^ 



YES 



YES 

WITH 
CONDITIONS 



MAYBE NO 



Other suggested methods for TRADE input to NFA's five-year curriculum management 
plan included: 

Providing input at the region's quarterly meetings. 

Establishing maiUng lists and forwarding progress reports and questionnaires. 



TRADE '86 Report 



42 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



NFA CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 
AND DEPLOYMENT VALIDATION 



At this working session, all members of TRADE 
were briefed on current NFA short-term 
curriculum planning for upcoming course 
development efforts and on specific changes in 
methodology and delivery formats that are 
currently being considered. Topics addressed in 
the briefing were the proposed FPD Leadership 
curriculum, the proposed NFA Haz Mat 
curriculum, the proposed NFA Prevention 
curriculum, the proposed FPD Safety 
curriculum, modularization of FPD courses, 
instructor-led versus self-study course 
methodology and the use of wallet-sized course 
summary cards. 

After the briefings, participants retired to their 
regional workrooms to complete the workshop 



questionnaires. The regional work groups were 
given 90 minutes to answer 23 questions. Each 
region was instructed to conduct large-group 
discussions of each question (or topical group of 
questions), and then have each participant 
individually answer the question(s) on his/her 
individual questionnaire. This process was 
repeated until all topics/questions were 
addressed. 

The following is a replication of each question 
asked in the questionnaire, including the 
background information provided to the 
participants. All results shown are computed 
from raw responses of the entire body of 
conference participants, and do not represent 
regional aggregates. 



I. MODULARIZATION OF COURSES 

It has been proposed that NFA hand-off courses be reformatted into shorter modules. This is to make 
the materials easier to use and to more flexibly fit into staff training schedules. For example, a typical 
two-day course might be reformatted into four 3-hour modules, each with its own student manual, 
activities, and exam questions. 





liiiiiis^iilii 


'mmmmiimmmmMMi 




lyiiiiiii 


Wmmmmimms 


llll^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


Would you prefer 




130 








,„ 




the handoff courses 




' "'/ ' 






to be modularized? 




■:rn^: 














'i/'' " 








YES 






''^f^:,2"i 


6 


6 




YES MAYBE 


NO 















TRADE '86 Report 



43 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



How long should 
the modules be? 



Vary 
from 
1-3 hours 



59 



TiT!^ 




MnaeeiBa^iHHiiaHi 







|i:g:.|::|... ;..;:.j.:;;;;;;;;..jjjjjjj^^^^^^^^^^ 


iiiiiiiiiiiii^^^^^^^^^ 


■i-<-x-:<<-:<-:-xs!i-V!!-Vf 


sffimJHii 


ijiiiiss 




9 


27 


100 






Will the requirement to 
take modules in sequence 
pose a problem? 








NO 




H 


f:"".v:;;;:j 


YES MAYBE 


NO 













When modularized, 
how should student 
manuals be provided? 



Available 3 ways: 
-by 2 day book 
-by module 
-unbound (for 
use in binders) 



TRADE '86 Report 

44 




2 day dY both 

book module 



un- other 

bound 




Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



n. SELF-STUDY VS INSTRUCTOR-BASED PROGRAMS 

Funding cuts, staffing cuts, confliicting priorities and many other fire department resource problems 
have been cited by some experts as presenting the need for alternative approaches to fire service 
training. Would you like the NFA to provide training materials in different formats? Please comment 
on the following possibilities and evaluate them in terms of convenience and suitability for your 

training needs. 



SELF-STUDY VS. 
INSTRUCTOR- 
BASED 
PROGRAMS 



Slight 

preference 

for 

traditional 

instruction 

and 

"canned" 

instruction 



SELF-PACED 
INSTRUCTION 


4 


ff 


,2 


1 


Strongly 
Like 


1 * 
Like 


1 
Dislike 


Strongly 
Dislike 




COMPUTER- 
BASED 
INSTRUCTION 


4 
1 


2.81 


2 

1 


1 
1 


1 
Strongly 
Like 


1' 

Like 


1 
Dislike 


1 
Strongly 
Dislike 


"CANNED" 
INSTRUCTION 


4 

\— 
Strongly 
Like 


3.17 
Like 


2 

h- 

Dislike 


1 

1 

Strongly 
Dislike 




TRADITIONAL 
(INSTRUCTOR 
LED) 


4 
1 


3.23 


2 


1 


1 
Strongly 
Like 


' 1 

Like 


1 
Dislike 


1 
Strongly 
Dislike 



TRADE '86 Report 



45 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



THE 

COMMAND 

SEQUENCE 



m. PLASTIC-LAMINATED WALLET CARDS: 

Pictured is a sample of plastic- 
laminated wallet-sized cards that could 
be provided for each NFA hand-off 
course. It is proposed that we provide 
the cards with each student manual, 
and that they be given to the students 
upon completion of each class. 



One of the current proposals is that 
cards be prepared for the 1987 hand- 
off courses Preparing for Incident 
Command (PIC) and Commanding the 
Initial Response (CIR), and that the 
cards be a component of the materials 
that would be provided under the 
student manual support program for 
PIC and CIR next year. 




NATIONAL FIRE ACADEMY COURSE 
PREPARING FOR INCIDENT COMMAND 



Would you distribute 
plastic-laminated 
wallet cards If they 
were provided? 



YES, with 

some 

disagreement 




24 




YES MAYBE NO 



Do you think the cards 
would be of value, either 
as an incentive or as a 
content reinforcer? 



NO, to MAYBE 



41 





YES 



MAYBE NO 



TRADE '86 Report 
46 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



IV. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CURRICULUM REVIEW 

On October 7-10, 1986, a curriculum review committee met at Emmitsburg to evaluate NFA's 
hazardous materials curriculum. The draft report from this review meeting was sent to all TRADE '86 
Conference attendees for the purpose of allowing in-depth review of the proposals for this important 
curriculum area. The following questions address this report. 



The curriculum review committee assessed the hazardous materials 
response problem nationally, and identified six key job "functions" 
for which training was critically needed on a national scale. 
Conference attendees were asked to prioritize these functions 
according to their perception of severity of need for training. 



HAZARDOUS 

MATERIALS 

CURRICULUM; 

Prioritize 

training 

functions 



PRIORITY 


"1 FIRST RESPONDER 


PRIORITY 


r\ HAZ MAT RESPONSE 
^TEAM MEMBER 


PRIORITY 


3 HAZ MAT RESPONSE 
TEAM OFFICER 


PRIORITY 


4 HAZ MAT INCIDENT 
SCENE MANAGER 


PRIORITY 


5 INSPECTOR WITH 
HAZ MAT 
RESPONSIBLITY 


PRIORITY 


6 HAZ MAT 

ADMINISTRATOR/ 
COORDINATOR 




TRADE '86 Report 



47 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



A proposal was submitted to the TRADE '86 attendees outlining the 
possible national distribution and hand-off of the two- week Resident 
Programs Division course Hazardous Materials Tactical Considerations. 
The following questions relate to that proposal. 











51 




41 




42 




Hazardous Materials 
Curriculum: Would your 
organization be interested 
in the proposal to hand 
off the resident course 
Haz Mat Tactical 
Considerations? 


























»■-%, 




MAYBE 

with more organizations 
interested than not 


TCd IVIATtSt: NU 























Are any of the requirements 
[for receiving the HM Tactics 
Course] a matter of concern 
for your organization? 



NO, IT IS 
NOT A 
CONCERN 



Suitable 
Facility 



Major 
concerns are: 

-6 deliveries/year 

-$15,000 cost 



Deliver 
6/year 

Send two perm 
officers to TtT 

Cost of 

$15,000 




TRADE '86 Report 
48 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



INDIVIDUAL COMMENTS 

The following are individual comments from TRADE '86 Conference participants, highlighting 
more specific concerns, issues, or ideas surrounding the proposal to hand off the two-week 
Resident Program Division course Hazardous Materials Tactical Considerations. 



Pending discussions with 
headquarters and drawing up of a 
formal proposal it is difficult to 
make a commitment. The need is 
there - whether department would 
take the steps necessary to send the 
proper number of personnel to a site 
is unknown to me at this time. 

I suggest that some of the courses be 
opened to officers in charge of 
response teams and not only limited 
to training officers. 

Only the minimum number of course 
offerings. 

I wonder if we should closely 
examine a standard on a national 
level to specify or identify 
appropriateness of non-career 
involvement in Haz Mat hands-on, re- 
training standards and frequencies. 

When can we begin? 

No! 

It seems to me that this would only 
be possible for a State Academy. 

I like it very much - Super proposal. 

A two-week course to be used to 
train all the possible Haz Mat 
Responders (at this level) is 
unrealistic due to class size, funding, 
and scheduling problems. The idea is 
excellent but I feel that a shorter 
course would possibly be able to 
facilitate more people who need the 
training. 

There is an urgent need for Haz Mat 
training at all levels and the total 
cost of the program should be with 

the NFA. 



This propxjsal can only be accepted 
by large metros and states with big, 
BIG $S$ budgets. This shuts out a 
lot of people. 

Absolutely impractical. Not a 
serious proposal. Practical only if 
NFA or another Federal Agency will 
offset more of the cost of delivery. 



Hope it wouldn't replace other 
train/trainer course programs in its 
present state and cost. 

Could the academy send an instructor 
to each state for a train-the-trainer 
class for less cost than our people 
traveling to the academy. 

It wasn't clear what SI 5,000 bought. 

It sounds like the Academy does not 
really want to make this work. Why 
couldn't the equipment needed be 
transported from site to site? Is it 
expendable? 

This is something 1 would have to 
study and be able to present it to 
my supervisor. Maybe between us, 
small departments in our immediate 
area, and chemical handlers we could 
possible meet these requirements. 

Not at this time. Need an 
opportunity to explore cost and 
delivery factors. 

Some form of payment should be 
made on a per student basis by the 
National Fire Academy. 

There should be some federal funds 
to help only those states which are 



able to provide training facilities, 
residential and food services on one 
site. 

No. 

Yes. We have identified some 
problems with student selection at 
the Academy. This class is one that 
seems to be in high demand. We 
identified some ways that this 
problem could, to some extent, be 
reduced. Now, for 515,000, we can 
get those people in this class in 
own state. In addition, if we buy 
the program, it should be up to us 
as to how many classes we 
conduct. 

It should be a hand-off course. 

This does not seem to be a very 
profitable way for us to train in 
Hazardous Materials on the local 
level. 

I think we may be over reaching to 
the Hazardous Material situation and 
I am not sure that materials locally 
would not suffice. For example, a 
lot of chemical companies would 
consider teaching us a class in 
exchange for Fire Brigade Training. 

Great Idea-we need this. 

Hands on training opens areas of 
possible liability in a very cloudy 
situation. 

Possible joint effort by all local 
departments. 

Could be a more viable approach on 
a regional level. 



TRADE '86 Repor t 



49 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



This course should be designed into 
sequential 8-hour models for use in 
the field, independent of the resident 
program. 

The two-week resident course 
approach will be very difficult to 
implement due to students from the 
volunteer organizations unable to 
commit not only money, but 
personal leave days. Career 
departments would find it difficult to 
give up a person for the period, with 
no program in place. 

The six courses per annum would 
also be a real challenge, but not an 
impossibility. If the organization 
was only able to assist with (3) 
courses per year, the NFA Support 
should be forthcoming. 
To hold to the premise that the 
course material cannot be delivered 
successfully in (3) or (6) hour 
blocks of instruction, is like stating 
that a college degree is not obtainable 
by anyone other than a full-time 
student. While it is recognized that 
the proposed two week approach is 
desired and proven effective, it should 
also be recognized that a high 
percent of American fire responders, 
EMT/A's, CRT's and paramedics 
have been instructed under the 
modular method and have gone on to 
acquire state and national certification 
at given levels of competency. 

The logistics would present a 

problem. 

Delivery of 6 times a year would take 

12 weeks out of our 52. 

" IMPOSSIBLE " 

Cost would be prohibitive. 

Why not delivery by NFA adjuncts 
taught in local area with state 
sponsor? 

1. Lower cost 

2. More productivity 

3. Much more exposure 

Quality will suffer greatly! 



Redo the course in modules so it can 
be offered in shorter sequences (either 
in 2 day or evenings). Many 
volunteers do not receive that much 
vacation in a year. 

Explore the possibility of holding it 
on a regional basis. 

1 think this is an unrealistic 
commitment for local jurisdictions. 
The amount of training for this one 
course could strain the resources of a 
department's capabilities, while 
eliminating other needed capabilities 
and preventing other needed training. 
A regional approach would be 
more appropriate. 

I don't care how you want it done. If 
I spend money on it I'll use it in a 
way convenient to my students (in 
modules , and not as a two-week 
program). 

Concept is good but there should by 
financial assistance to keep costs 
down for local organizations. 

Yes. If we're willing to invest the 
dollars for material and salaries and 
expenses for 2 full-time instructors 
to attend T-t-T, there should be no 
other requirements. We would have 
no need for 6 courses a year~but, 
would need at least one. 

The organization that cannot meet 
all of the requirements should not be 
deprived of sending instructors for 
train-the-trainer course. 

Would have to present to local 
officials a proposal to fund. 

It would not be possible to deliver 
this program six times a year in the 
Dayton F.D. due to other training 
requirements. 

One of the things that makes this 
program so effective is the number of 
case studies that are used. The in- 



cidents are sent to the NFA and 
incorprated into the course. I am 
concerned that this flow would be 
shut off. Various departments that 
have incidents could not send tapes 
to all parties conducting this 
training. These materials would 
have to be sent to a central 
location, reviewed, and then 
distributed to course providers~I 
don't know if this would be practical 
but without the constant update the 
course would suffer. 

I think the idea has merits. 

This proposal should be a 
cooperative effort between the State 
and Metro departments within. It is 
felt that with cooperation the 
program would be a success. 

4-6 part-time instructors per site may 
be more practical (I am not aware of 
anyone who can get away from their 
current job for 12 weeks) 
I currently do not have 2 people 
available that have 12 weeks with 
nothing to do!! Hiring 2 new 
people would be very difficult. 

A stipend arrangement should be 
considered as it is for NFA. 

This could be included into our 
existing course so all US Air Force 
Haz Mat personnel would have an 
opportunity to receive the 
information. 

If you can't pay for it-don't ask. At 
state level our problem often is not 
expertise curriculum development, 
etc. It's money!! 

Could be done by state or region. 
But curriculum development is 
needed first. 

Develop the program-Utillize TtT 
training at NFA~let permanent 
training officers return to their 



TRADE '86 Report 
50 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



organization with several formats of 
the program. Deliver whatever can 
be deUvered in whatever format is 
possible. Reason: At least you get 
the information out there, as 
opposed to having people waiting 
indefinitely to attend full-blown 
programs before they get any 
information. 

If a system to defray student expense 
to attend were provided, this would 
be a very interesting program to our 
state. 

NFA now would have contradicting 
policies. Field says you can modify 
programs after handoff, resident says 
"our way or no way". Do they not 
trust States and Metros' competence? 

Not at this time. 

We would more likely take the 
curriculum from this class and use 
what we can of it in our already 
existing programs. We would not 
present it in its set format. 

We have the equipment presently. 
Replacement of the equipment 



through continuous use would 
present a monetary problem. 

If NFA wants to reach more students 
through a handout type course, I 
believe Federal reimbursement of 
salary costs (instructors) and 
reimbursement of the $15,000 must 
be considered. 

Possible under a "Regional" format. 

Our difficulty is in the consecutive 
80-hour course presentation. 

I have to support this as being a very 
good idea. Will probably fit in well 
with the new EDA mandates to 
states. 

The concept is excellent. The cost to 
our state is prohibitive. The 
requirement for staff training would 
require the dedication of full time 
people we do not have, nor could 
our population support six 
presentations in any given year. 

The National Fire Service would be 
better served to seek additional 



funding and increase the NFA's 
ability to provide quality courses on 
a larger scale. 

This program does not dovetail with 
existing programs and in some ways 
is reinventing the wheel. 

Contract or hand off program to 
DOE to present in conjunction with 
these training to Neveda test site-In 
addition to efforts at Academy. 

Two-week resident course not really 
viable for us at this time. 

Due to the cost of the program and 
limited facilities, I believe that 
Academy sponsorship through the 
community college will be a 
necessity for many areas. 

This is a rather interesting concept; 
however, I think it is going to be 
difficult to pull off. 



TRADE '86 Repor t 



51 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



First Responder Program 

Conference attendees were briefed on a proposed development of a hand-off training program 
for first responders to hazardous materials incidents that would be organized into twelve three- 
hour modules of instruction. Attendees were asked to comment on the suitability of the format 
(sUdes, video, resource kits for additional material) for their needs, and on whether they have 
the staff and resources needed to deUver such an extensive training program. 



Do you have the staff and 
resources in your jurisdiction 
to deliver a twelve-module 
First Responder Program? 



/ 


83 


\ 




jB^^^^^^^^^^^ 


19 


^^^i 




\ 


YES 


NO J 



Additional comments by the participants of TRADE '86 about this proposed instructional 
program are listed below. 



We at the Training Academy try to 
use as many training aids as 
possible in our program and I think 
this package will stimulate both our 
instructors and our trainees- 
suppression force etc. 



The first responder is the top priority 
the persons need the information 
protect themselves and the pubhc. 

Component/format should be varied 
depending on the subject 

You must realize that trying to train 
a large department requires our 
breaking the program down into 
modules that we can handle. Our 
problem is to deliver what we can to 



as many as we can, and then follow 
up with in-service training 
programs. Not just Haz-Mat 
training. 

How soon is immediate ? 

Indicate that it is a HM first- 
responder program. There already 
exist X number of first responders 
course offerings in the F/R service 
first responder and overall public 
safety. 

This is a difficult subject and I feel 
would be very confusing without an 
instructor present. 

"1st Responder" is an EMS term- 
this use could lead to some 
confusion in NC. 



We have a 40 hrs. program required 
by state of Horida. 

Send adjunct to prep. 

Send adjunct. 

Have resources for dehvery. 

It can be done continuing the TtT 
context; however, it would take a 
long time without 7 sets of 
materials. 

We do not have the staff or resources 
to dehver this program. 

Not enough staff. 

This would be a redundant program - 
material would be covered in other 
courses. 



TRADE '86 Report 
52 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



We have the staff and resources. 

Would need to find time. 

I feel it is imperative to get this 
program in the field ASAP. 

We schedule courses to meet 
students' needs. They need the 
training. We are doing some 
training. Get it out now or don't 
bother. Everyone will be trained. 

The format appears realistic for 
application to the masses. It could 
be offered on a course or on a 
modular basis. Resources shouldn't 
be a problem in most jurisdictions. 

Have the staff. Need no other 
support. 

Yes (we can deliver it), if my CEO 
decides to make the commitment. 

Staff is not a problem as much as 
timing and especially scheduling. 

A very detailed instructor's guide so 
the information could be safely 
delivered. 

Staff and resources thru district 
schools could be a delivery vehicle. 

Top quality instructor guide and good 
description of the AV materials (and 
their intent). 

This seems reasonable. 

We could deliver if it fits existing 
Illinois program. If not, we will not 
use it. 

We could deliver the program 
provided we had control of the where 
and whens. We have the instructors 
and equipment. 



This course would be given by the 
Academy and our field adjunct (Haz 
Mat) personnel. 

I have the staff and you are providing 
the resource in the form of the course 
material. 

We break down most courses to a 
manageable time for the number of 
members that must be trained. Even 
with a large staff, this is the only 
way we are able to handle the 
training. 

Assistants would be Umited, due to 
the fact that the course is in modules 
and can be stretched into longer 
periods of time for completion. 

We have staff and facilities to deliver 
it for our department 

No. Personnel, materials. 

Sufficient staff to deliver. Would 
need instructional support for T.O.'s 
to deliver. 

Delivering this package would 
present a problem. Working it in 
with other training needs would tax 
my training hours greatly. 

Would need to add personnel to 
training staff. Would investigate 
industrial and local educational 
support to assist with program 
delivery. 

Must obtain some help. 

No. Adjunct instruction. 

Facilides requirements, instructor 
background, materials list. 

1 feel we have the staff for our 
department. I feel that each 



instructor should have some 
background in the subject prior to 
teaching it. Instructor should attend 
appropriate NFA resident programs. 

Support needed in prevention aspect. 

If AV material/support is available, 
we have instructor support available. 

Yes, possible any other funding. 

No problem with staff and resources. 
None. 

TtT program on video. 

Yes, appropriate handouts. 

Over a period of what time? 

We will use existing resources and re- 
direct them to the Haz Mat courses. 
We may not have the number of 
deliveries by the academy, however. 
We need instructor technical training 
from the academy. 

Send adjunct 

Yes, evaluation or instructor support 
(assist with questions the instructor 
may not be sure oQ. 

Yes, have the staff (part-time) also 
would cooperate with other agencies. 
Just like TtT, provide instructor 
materials and student manual. 

No resources are needed other than 
student manuals. 

I very much like this approach. It 
could be easily presented. 

It would be high priority for us to 
get this program deUvered to all our 
people. 



TRADE '86 Report 



53 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



OVERALL 
REACTION TO 
HAZ MAT 
CURRICULUM 



2.88 



PROPOSED 

RESIDENT 

CURRICULUM 



Strongly Agree Disagree Strongly 
Agree Disagree 



B. 

PROPOSED 
FIELD 
CURRICULUM 



3.07 



Strongly Agree Disagree Strongly 
Agree Disagree 




Listed below are additional comments and suggestions offered by the TRADE '86 
Conference attendees with regard to the Academy's overall proposed hazardous 
materials curriculum. 



I feel that the overall direction is 
excellent with the possible exception 
of overall length of training. 

It is the only way to reach the 
masses. 

Seven courses are too many. A 
smaller number would make it more 
possible. I see departments trying to 
speciahze individuals. If you can 
only take one course a year then it 
will take too long to get a specialist 
who can train your department. 

Lack of funds. Lack of available 
time by staff. 

Good! 

What do we do with current 
programs? Throw away? 
Students applying should be screened 
further. List of equipment with 
budget for Haz Mat. 

Resident curriculum provides no 
more than two training officers from 
each department. They must conduct 
and provide Haz Mat skills to 



produce resource team. Show budget 
line trends for Haz Mat equipment for 
fiscal year attending Academy. 

I feel our first order of importance is 
to prevent unnecessary suffering by 
our personnel and citizens. To do 
this our first responders need incident 
recognition, identification, and 
containment training. Once 
contained it would be possible to get 
expert resources to aid in follow-up. 

I personally do not feel this field 
program is feasible both in time and 
money devoted. 

It is needed. These areas were 
identified over 4 years ago. It is 
time. 

There is a definite need for this type 
of progressive education. A good 
deal of thought and expertise has 
gone into this report and 
questionnaire. Go for it! 

I disagree with the idea that the scene 
manager needs to be Haz Mat 
specialist. If the Incident 



Commander (IC) is competent, he 
will use the Haz Mat specialist for 
advice. If the IC won't use the Haz 
Mat specialist's advice, we have a 
leadership training problem, not a 
Haz Mat problem. Otherwise, it 
follows that we will need a specialist 
to "command" EMS alarms, a 
process which cannot be furnished. 

I am concerned that the 3-hour 
modules planned on each hazard class 
cannot go into the needed depth. 
This is a great step forward however. 

It is a good concept and I am 
impressed with its validity to address 
the problem. 

Six, six -hour courses would be more 
efficient in my own situation. May 
limit the chances of some courses 
being cut or not finished being 
developed over time. 

Far too little time and information 
for totally objective review. 

Agree with statement made in general 
meeting about the NFA staying out 



TRADE '86 Report 
54 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



of "hands-on" programs. The need 
for Haz Mat training is too great to 
restrict by the availability of 80-hour 
training programs. Courses need to 
be designed for hand-off for levels 
other than first-responder. 

I see Uttle wrong with the package 
that has been handed off. 

I feel there is definite need to expand 
the program and make it available to 
more persons. However, 14 weeks 
seems an unrealistic amount of time. 
Perhaps more emphasis should be 
placed on doubling up on the 
presentations of the currently 
available programs. There does 
appear to be a lot of redundancy. 
Current ICS and inspection program 
addresses two of these areas. 

There is a need, but insufficient time 
for evaluation. 

I very much like the breakdown of 
training functions for Haz Mat. It is 
valid and appropriate and would fill a 
need in our state. Again I must ask 
you to consider reducing the time of 
delivery to make it palatable for local 
volunteer firefighter delivery. We 
need the fu-st-responder program now! 
In PA, we have a fire academy first- 
responder program. An EMS first- 
responder program delivered through 
the department of health and an EMA 
first responder for state police. Your 
programs would serve to meet all of 
those constituent needs in PA and 
would provide a unified first- 
responder approach. If you don't 
develop this program, we will do our 
own. That will make your program 
less attractive to us when it is finally 
released. 

Where do we teach people how to 
analyze if they need a Haz Mat team? 

The programs to be delivered look 
great! However, we still get back the 
same old problem of dehvering these 



courses to the people that need them 
in a timely manner. There appears to 
be too many restrictions (namely 6 
classes/year) on the hand-off 
program. Also, it's too expensive. 
The combined departments in my 
area may be able to combine 
resources to do this. 

While Haz Mat is an important 
problem facing the fire service, the 
proposed increase in courses on this 
subject may be putting the fire 
service in areas that should be best 
handled by other professionals such 
as chemists and environmentalists. 

I agree that the report has an accurate 
assessment of need; however, the 
question to me is: Can a locality 
afford the cost involved. 

I guess I agree, but the increase in 
training time and availability of the 
training is of concern. In order to get 
this training and information out to 
the field it is going to require field 
programs, not resident program. 

In a practical sense, a 2-week course 
which provides the basic Haz Mat 
approach from the first stage of 
isolation to the final stage of 
termination of the incident would be 
beneficial to many fire service 
members. This would provide a 
good basic level source of knowledge 
in a short period. Since it would 
take a long time to complete all 
seven residency courses, the basic 
course seems to be the most 
appropriate way to start an individual 
in the right direction. 

Thank you for sending the advance 
document: Time does not permit me 
to make a quality response in this 
curriculum validation workshop. 

Pleased with initial formatting 
method. However, secondary review 
should be accomplished by larger 
group. In addition to the plan, an 



indication of its ability to be 
implemented should have been 
included. This should have included 
a predicted time frame. If 
implementation is not practical given 
current and projected political 
climates, then efforts should be 
expanded in other areas. More 
specific information is required on 
exact curriculum development to 
make appropriate comments. 

Noble ideas, but from a practical 
standpoint I suspect only a small 
number of people will be able to 
receive the full benefit of the course 
in the way it is intended. 
Realistically, it should be reserved 
for Haz Mat Response Teams first as 
most departments that have such a 
team available, call for same and 
expect the answers to come from 
those individuals. 

The 24 hours for first-responder 
imposes a large, almost impossible 
training time demand. The RIHM 
course gives a good first-responder 
overview. I feel the RIHM course 
should be the basis for the functional 
groups. The scene management 
course should be shortened to 1 week 
and handed off to states and regions. 
Eliminate behavior of Haz Mat. 
This course can be offered at local 
colleges or via open learning. 

Resident courses should emphasize 
student interaction, computer 
simulations, etc. A 2- or 3-week 
resident course should be the last 
choice instead of the first choice. 
Consider one-week courses with 
competency requirements for 
admission. 

Fine for a brainstorming sesssion 
report. Now temper it with reality of 
resources, staffing, facility, etc. 
Needs to look more at what exists at 
state and local level. You may find 
the "savages are already civilized." 



TRADE '86 Report 



55 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



I agree with your concept to try to 
reach each individual needing a Haz 
Mat background/awareness of dangers 
and control procedures. 



I think all of the programs could be 
delivered in the field. 

The overview has correctly identified 
the national problem. I believe the 
assessment of need is accurate and the 
major function areas of study follow 
a logical manageable progress. 

A concentrated effort needs to be 
made to see that there is no 
dupUcation of material within the 
classes. There is no reason to offer 
the course unless there is new 
information to be presented. 

I question how this may compare 
with the manufacturing chemical 
councils program and if contact has 
been made to reinforce each or reduce 
redundancy. 

A "scene manager" trainee cannot get 
into the prerequisite courses due to 
the large demand and the courses 
being filled on a first-come basis. 
Reserve spots for "key persons" in 
the lower level classes. 

Appears to be a need to establish a 
national consensus on course content 
and a means to determine levels or 
degrees of competency. 

Process O.K. I felt in some areas I 
could not accurately assess my 
department's needs. We have no 
present training. 

Strongly need courses of 2 days for 
us, may be willing to reproduce all 
materials at our expense. We are 
willing to pilot programs with NFA. 

The input from this conference needs 
to be integrated with this program. 



Will Haz Mat still be "hot" in 5 
years? Good concept but needs major 
financial support 

I have to question how far the fu« 
service feels it has to go. There has 
to be a cutoff somewhere of what we 
don't do. I feel that we might be at 
those limits now. The amount of 
education that is required for the fu-e 
service is nowhere near what is 
needed to understand and handle a 
severe Haz Mat incident 

Time frame to implement courses 
appears to be too long according to 
comments from NFA staff Need for 
courses is definitely obvious. 

Too many, too long. 

Very informative report I do 
question the deUvery mode of Haz 
Mat course increase. 

Good job! I'm sure that a lot of 
blood, sweat and tears went into the 
preparation of this document I 
believe that we are traveling in the 
right direction. The only 
contribution that I can add is that 
coordination with the new NFPA 
National Professional qualification 
may eUminate confusion or 
difficulties for departments to meet 
the new proposed standards. 

My evaluation is clouded by not 
knowing what is necessary for 
certification in the various areas. I 
beUeve the technician level courses, 
due to the cost of equipment and 
restrictions for the release of various 
chemicals limiting their use, must be 
consohdated and given at a national 
or regional level. There must, 
however, at some point in time be a 
certifiable course that will meet legal 
requirements. Due to a more hmited 
audience, management courses are 
needed, but not at the expense of 
technician courses. 



I feel one of the greatest assets the 
NFA can do is to provide a "standard" 
for the country for various levels. 

Good report. No objections. Much 
is already in place in CA. 

Development of course by NFA is 
O.K., but don't conduct the courses 
at this level. Develop a core of 
trainers to go to areas that request the 
course and train the trainers there. 

A representative of my department 
was here for this course and we have 
been using a variation of this 
information. 

I have serious concerns relating to 
the policy of "Field Testing" off- 
campus programs! 

I believe this targets the needs of a 
Haz Mat course with an accurate 
diversion or breakdown of the major 
areas for a Haz Mat course. The 
heavy emphasis on first-responders 
leaming is justified. 

The curriculum committee did a 
commendable job. However, if the 
proposed programs are implemented, 
given the demand for Haz Mat 
training, it seems likely that other 
necessary programs (resident) will be 
shunted aside. Also, I do not beheve 
practical training belongs in the 
curriculum for higher education. The 
practical level training should be 
provided at the local level. 

The plan is O.K.; however, I would 
hate to see it pursued at the expense 
of development and resident 
participation in other programs. 
Believe it or not I think the fire 
service as a whole has to deal with 
more critical issues (survival, 
financial). I hope that the main 
focus of programs at the Fire 
Academy will continue to address 
these other, more encompassing 



TRADE '86 Report 
56 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



issues which so far has been done 
pretty well (management, leadership 
series, command, and fire 
prevention). 

I am concerned about the direction 
the Federal EPA is moving and if 
there will be dupUcation of programs 
sponsored thru state emergency 
management/EPA groups. 

Seems to be an accurate and complete 
proposal answering many needs. 

Resident program is too long. It 
would (at the rate of 1 course per 
year) take 7 years to get an individual 
through the entire program. This 
doesn't even begin to take into 
account any delays for development. 
These need to be field programs, 
developed and handed off as quickly 
as possible. 

More field programs - quicker handoff 
to operational levels. 

Ha2ardous Materials: The Pesticide 
Challenge should remain in the NFA 
curriculum. In the Midwest, this is a 
definite problem area, and we find 
that this topic fills a vast void in 
firefighter training- urban and rural 
alike. The pesticide incident is a very 
realistic scenario that happens all too 
frequently and needs to be continually 
taught to our firefighters. Additional- 
ly, some emphasis to the problem 
should be given in one of the 
Resident courses. 

Hazardous Materials Incident 
Analysis lends credence to the 
hazardous materials problem but does 
not go far enough in the 
D.E.C.I.D.E. process. In [a recent 
deUvery] were seventeen career and 
eleven volunteer firefighters/officers 
that had not been exposed to the 
subject matter before. The course 
evaluations.. .were very favorable. 
Events analysis is important, but we 
agree with the Review Committee 



that is was probably drawn out too 
long in several areas. This course is 
valuable but does need some 
revamping. 

Recognizing and Identifying 
Hazardous Materials is an excellent 
starter couise and is positively 
received from the students we have 
taught It needs to continue as a field 
program taught by competent 
instructors. Our entire department has 
attended the course through the Train- 
the-Trainer program. 

Our department agrees with the 
Review Committee's recommenda- 
tions for redevelopment of the 
Hazardous Materials Substance 
Specialist course. A high priority 
should be given to developing this 
course. 

After giving this more thought, I'm 
not sure this will work. If you're 
developing a course in your state or 
department, you don't have a long 
time to get all of this accompUshed. 
It would take one person too long to 
go through all the courses. Now if 
this was taught in the field, you may 
be more apt to get to more people. 1 
know this takes time to develop and 
implement, but when a town or 
organization is ready and their need is 
now, they are going to fulfill that 
need now. 

Report analysis methods and 
approaches to solutions valid. 
Would caution as to 
overcommitment to possibly just a 
trendy issue: is it fact or myth 
regarding actual potential and can we 
reasonably expect full commitment 
by local fire departments. It appears 
there is misconception on cuirent 
Tactical Considerations course. 

One problem, based on our 
experience of attending the Academy, 
is the availability of the courses. The 
basic and prerequisite courses should 



be given in the field with the NFA 
providing Train-the-Trainer 
programs. For a reponse team 
member to receive the full HM 
training (at one class per year) the 
minimum time required would be 
three-to-four years...Our personnel 
would be out of the program about 
mid-way through. 

All of proposed courses look good. 
It would be outstanding if some of 
them could be put on video tape for 
instruction off site. As you know, it 
is not practical or feasible for 
everyone to attend the National Fire 
Academy. If these tapes could be 
purchased or rented with the 
supporting handout materials that 
would allow for more people to 
receive the training. 

Content appears to repeat itself in 
several areas between Hazardous 
Materials for the First Responder and 
Hazardous Materials Operating Site 
Practices ( HMOSP). Suggest a basic 
discussion of haz mat tactics vs. fu-e 
tactics be included in HMOSP. 

There are many agencies projecting 
and teaching Haz Mat courses. There 
is a need for a well constructed, 
rehable Haz Mat course that I am 
sure the Fire Academy could deUver. 

How does EMI view their role in 
upper level Haz Mat management 
courses? Any overlap? Since the 
number of requests can't be filled at 
NFA, and future federal dollars are in 
doubt, field programs should be 
given serious consideration only if 
quality can be assured. 

It puts some organizations into the 
program. It gives you steps to take 
while advancing up the Haz Mat 
ladder. 



TRADE '86 Repor t 



57 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



V. PREVENTION CURRICULUM 

In 1986, the Academy conducted a review of the Prevention curriculum. The committee report 
described a critical national need in the area of prevention training, but felt that at this time the greatest 
focus should be in the NFA Resident curriculum. It was thought that there are significant technological 
and skill-level impediments to the national off-campus delivery of prevention and codes enforcement 
training. The following questions address this issue. 



The national problem of diminishing resources has created a possible catch- 
22 for the fire service. Many fire service experts feel the prevention 
programs are the long-term solution to meeting the fire challenge with less 
resources. Yet the short-term needs to maintain an adequate suppression 
capability in the face of resource cutbacks often mean severely cutting back 
in the area of prevention and codes enforcement. The following questions 
poll existing levels of training and ideas on how to address this problem. 



Prevention curriculum: 
What percent of 
your present training 
addresses prevention 
at the company level? 



16.57 



16.57% 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 

HIGH= 60 
LOW= 
TOTAL NO. OF RESPONSESr 127 



Prevention curriculum: 
What percent of your 
present training is 
specifically related to fire 
code enforcement 
inspection? 



14.17 



14.17% 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 

HIGH= 70 

L0W= 

TOTAL NO. OF RESP0NSES= 125 



TRADE '86 Report 
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Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



Listed below are comments and suggestions from the participants of TRADE '86 about the 
national problem of low emphasis on prevention and codes enforcement (does the problem 
exist, and what can be done about it?). 



Much stronger emphasis on all levels 
both public and private for the need 
for a strong fire prevention effort. 

Needs a new name identification-Zip 
work. 

More man power. 

Code enforcement and inspection 
responsibility is in another state 
agency-CBFPI only program 
offered. 

Our fire department is adding time to 
current program at both recruit and 
company level. 

We need to meet fire system today. 
Will explore if programs are 
available. 

If this is a critical national problem 
why not hand it off to the states or 
bring the program to the states 
thereby increasing the total number 
of students attending the courses? 

Train the companies in this area. 

State statute's mandate certified 
inspectors, program has been in place 
for a number of years. 

State mandate that all inspectors be 
certified program is already in place. 

New bureau-answer is with our 
present position. 

NJ has a new fire inspection program- 
several of the NFA courses can be 
used in this program (CO inspector- 
Building Construction-Haz Mat, 
etc.) Can we have the NFA work 



with our official to get these 
programs accepted as part of our 
certification in NJ. 

All recruit level programs and entry 
level officer programs should address 
both prevention/inspection on a 
minimum of a 70/30 ratio. 

Management has to be awakened 
from their sleep. 

We produce prevention videos and 
send them out to operations 
companies with a quiz. 

Possibly add more field and TtT 
programs. 

The only training now is for fire 
prevention officers. I have 
recommended that all (personnel) be 
given four week or two week course 
in basic training of basic fire 
prevention. All officers on being 
promoted to Lieutentant spend tiiree 
to six months in the Bureau with a 
field inspector. The only other 
ti"aining is voluntary in college fire 
science departments. 

Due to increased trend of mergers of 
Building Safety divisions with fire 
departments an emphasis needs to be 
developed which will assist in the 
management of both IT and 
Building Safety. 

Include management of building and 
safety programs because of ti"end to 
combine operations of Building and 
Safety and Fire Prevention. 

We must change to the idea about 
whose responsibility area this is. 



Most feel that it is up to the FPR. 

I & E and analysis and planning 
receive some priority, not much 
else. 

In Nebraska, we have a program 
which encourages fire department 
personnel to start Prevention 
Programs on a year-round basis. We 
show them how, where to get 
materials, what people they can 
utilize in their community, how to 
determine what needs to be done, 
budgeting procedures, how to 
measure results, etc. We monitor the 
programs, receive monthly reports 
from cooperating towns, and help 
measure results. This basic program 
is working . This cannot wait or be 
treated as a long-term solution to 
meet the fire challenge; the time is 
now. Inspection programs are not 
the entire answer to fire prevention. 
There is so much more which needs 
to be done. And it can be done. But 
someone has to show the firefighters 
how to do the job. 

Fire prevention divisions would 
report 100% training in these areas. 

The problem is a fiscal issue to be 
solved in council chambers, not an 
issue that I can solve through a state 
training program. 

In our state the marshal's office has 
done some code enforcement training 
for fire departments as they tmn FM 
employees. 

Company level inspections are 
increasing and necessary training is 



TRADE '86 Report 
59 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



being done on a Battalion level. 

Maintain a good fire prevention 
program. 

Until the suppression activity level 
is reduced (residential sprinklers; 
better codes) the prevention/ 
education activities of company 
personnel will remain very limited. 



We are developing a program now to 
train company inspectors and feel we 
need it desperately. 

The problem is great enough to 
require a legislative mandate to 
correct it More adequate focusing 
and fiscal support would hopefully 
come out of such actions. 



Fire chiefs need to commit to what 
they have been saying. 

A concerted effort by all fire service 
organizations is needed to focus 
attention on the primary mission of 
the fire service which is fire 
prevention. 



A second catch-22 identified by the curriculum review team was the problem that, nationally, 
extensive speciahzed training in codes enforcement is needed in a volume far surpassing that 
which can be reached by Resident Programs. Yet the training needed is sufficiently 
specialized that the curriculum would exceed the instructor knowledge requirements 
presently associated with Train-the-Trainer courses. TRADE '86 Conference participants 
were asked whether a technical prevention hand-off curriculum would exceed the capabilities 
of their instructional staffs, and if so what suggestions could they offer as to how the 
instruction could be delivered nationally in the large numbers that are needed. 



This training should be given by 

prevention \-etenins who can instruct-- 
not by an instructor who must 
attempt to read up on a complex 
subject and then tr>' to teach a course 
on it! 

Regional programs would reach a 
greater audience than NFA Resident 
Programs, and would require a 
smaller cadne of trained instructors 
than NFA Field Programs and NFA 
hand-off programs. 

What is so special in the technical 
content of these courses? Weren't 
you once an average fire service 
instructor? 

Better (instructor) selection methods, 
obtaining personnel both within and 
outside the fire ser\'ice. 

Produce "canned" instructional 
packages in modular format of 
approximately 1.5 hrs. in length and 
authorize their reproduction by 
individual fire department 



organizations. Topics should range 
fiiam code and standard to managing 
programs. 

Not familiar enough with issue to 
make valid, constructive comments. 

Boy, you've got me, I'm not sure 
there is a good solution to this. 

You can't Must rely on private 
sector ([CBO) or community college 
programs. 

1 disagree! With an instructor 
briefing course, most could present a 

well-written course. 

I have considerable doubt that there 
are not sufficient qualified people in 
the field. Large fire prevention 
bureau in conjunction with training 
orgiinizations often produce major 
programs and, in some cases, the 
training organization puts the entire 
package together (including codes, 
etc.) for prevention. 



Code training is a state responsibilit>' 
who may need input from Academy 
on deliver)' content and format. 

If it is thought that the average 
instructor does not meet the 
minimum standards of NFA-and 
NFA residential constraints prohibits 
on campus programs in sufficient 
quantity- then you better put the 
show on the road. 

New York City has the people to 
teach this program right now. 

We need to train to the average level 
of intelligence within the fire 
services and not to the level of a 
chemical or industrial engineer. 

Stick to management issues at the 
Academy. Advocate, assist, and 
report on technical training process 
provided at local and state level. 

National public awareness does not 
e.xist 



TRADE '86 Report 
60 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



many people need this level of 
technical competence. 

Develop a complete package to meet 
the objectives of Inspector I of the 
Professional Quahfication System. 

System Analysis: FPSS I and II 
Code Enforcement, could be offered 
on a regional basis. 

Develop field courses-short, into 
type courses. 

Keep only the plans review, advanced 
tech, mgmt: Strategic Analysis at 
NFA Campus. 

What happened to Fire Safe Building 
Design for Architects? 

Adjunct instructor in state or regional 
concept 



Adjuncts at regional level. 

In NC we conduct a state level two 
week-three year cycle Fire 
Prevention School that works well. 
We use state experts mostly. We'll 
be glad to share currriculum. 

Through the state training academy. 

Train 50 or so instructors in resident 
training and then through grants or 
contacts have them in each state 
under contract for a period long 
enough to complete training on a 
local level. 

Is this (lack of qualified local 
instructors) an assumption or reality? 

Regional training through State Fire 
Marshals, State Training Directors, a 
University facility with guest 
instructors. 



Our FP specialists are given courses 
by outside instructors from the local 
colleges and universities. 



I don't think instructor availability is 
a problem ! ! ! Programs can be 
delivered regionally. 

Who says it is beyond capability of 
fire service? We do fine in lUinoiis. 
The talent is there-look harder and 
make less assumptions. 

Codes vary so much I don't know 
how you could do this. 

We need time to think this out. 

Codes and laws don't lend themselves 
to a national program. 



TRADE '86 Report 
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Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



VI. LEADERSHIP CURRICULUM 

In October, 1986, the Academy conducted a Phase I development team meeting to begin work on a 
new series of Field Programs courses on Leadership. After assessing national trends and projecting 
the diverse leadership problems facing fire service managers of the future, the development team 
proposed that four new courses be developed for hand-off designed for company and mid-level 
officers and addressing different aspects of leadership. The courses are: 

Leadership I: Personal Size-Up/Inventory 

Leadership II: Directing, Coaching, Supporting and Delegating 

Leadership HI: Decision-Making, Risk-Taking, & Problem-Solving 

Leadership IV: Applying Leadership Skills 
The team also proposed the development of one course for senior managers entitled New- Age 
Thinking for the Fire Service Executive: Ethics, Values, Creativity, and Vision. 

The Academy is considering the development of two courses for the company and mid-level officer, to 
be extracted from the larger four-course curriculum originally proposed. Participants of TRADE '86 
were asked the following questions, in order to assist the Academy in making the selection of content 
and format for these courses. 



LEADERSHIP CURRICULUM: 
What is the need for courses 
of this nature In your 
organization? 



HIGH 

to MED-HIGH 




50 



HIGH MED 
HIGH 



13 



MED MED 
LOW 



LOW 



LEADERSHIP CURRICULUM: 
What is the level of sophistication 
of the instructors in your 
organization on the subject 
of leadership? 



MED to 
MED-HIGH 




TRADE '86 Report 
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Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 





PRIORITY 7 


COMMUNICATIONS 




LEADERSHIP 








CURRICULUM: 


PRIORITY 2 


DIRECTING, COACHING, 




Prioritize topics 


SUPPORTING, 




(as proposed for 




DELEGATING 




the Leadership 








courses) in terms 


PRIORITY W 


DECISION MAKING 




of the training 








needs in your 
organization. 


PRIORITY A 


PERSONAL SIZE-UP 






PRIORITY ^ 


PROBLEM-SOLVING 






PRIORITY Q 


RISK-TAKING 










, 



Listed below are additional comments and suggestions from the participants of TRADE 'i 
regarding the proposed development of the new hand-off Leadership curriculum. 



Stress self development in areas that 
need has been identified. 

1. Develop the Sr. Officer program 
first! 

2. Deliver it on a regional basis. 

3. How do the NFA field FSSP and 
FSST fit into the system? 

The leadership program should be a 
high priority for off-site delivery, 
either direct NFA or TtT delivery. 

Apparently we need to include a 
section that teaches I.C. (Leaders) to 
heed the advice of specialists. 

The chief officer course should be a 
high priority. 

This program will fill a long 



existing void in the fire service. 

Prioritizing of each subject would be 
different for each organization, based 
on their present level of commitment 
and competence. 

This area is badly neglected. 

Ethics, values, physical-mental- 
spiritual balance, self worth, self- 
image, etc., etc.., are all areas that 
CEO's and their senior staff should 
be very knowledgeable in. 

Leadership-Much needed. 

1. Careful of instruments which 
many require experts to interpret. 

2. Coaching and supporting are very 
good. For directing and delegating 



there is lots of information available. 

3. Kemper-Treguo-can't remember 
name, but excellent program. 

4. Excellent approach. We have 
asked participants to bring problems 
to class and the group works on 
scenario for solution. 

Chief officer- visioning would be 

excellent-we have done several 

programs-vision 2(X)0-needs trained 

facilitators. 

In all cases-qualified instructors 

could be obstacle. 

Good Luck.... 

Research contemporary programs 
currently offered by colleges and 
universities. Many of these 
suggested courses should be upper 
level credit. 



TRADE '86 Repor t 
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Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



Advocate generic leadership training 
available at local level. 

Apply generic leadership training 
previously received at local level to 
fire service environment. 

Make sure these courses relate to 
"real" problems. 

Learning to delegate authority along 
with reasonabiUty. 

There should be more advertising 
about the Organizational Analysis 
and Renewal (OAR) program. 

Officer training is a major issue 
throughout the country and your 
efforts in this area should be 
expedited. 

I hope the Academy continues to 
reference their courses to specific 
NFPA Standards of all types, so that 
eventually most of these standards 
will be met (minus those that must 
be done locally). 

Tie all future courses to NFPA 
STDS (i.e., 15(X)) so both are 
fulfilled by each course. 

Don't leave out some of the 
problems with company officers and 
their relationship with unions and 
union problems. The close 
relationship and feelings they have 
with their union and its counterpart, 
the firefighters union, is important, 
and many new officers still look to 
the unions for guidance when they 
should be using their chief officers 
for guidance. 

Hopefully the programs are a TtT 
concept, in modular form for the first 

four. 

The senior officer program should be 
at the resident level. 

The more individual exercises leading 
to group exercises that you provide. 



the better the course will be. Try to 
be flexible in these exercises so that 
local problems that the officers 
know exist can be easily plugged in. 

Can see heavier responsibihty being 
placed upon 1st line supervisors (i.e. 
recognizing and dealing with 
controlled substances). Sexual 
harassment. Labor management- 
administration. More liability 
issues surfacing. More required 
company level training. Community 
involvement, particularly in strong 
neighborhood associations. 
Involvement in home-inspection 
programs. 

The most important part of the 
leadership program is Leadership IV. 
After we teach the aspects of 
Leadership they must be appUed by 
the officer so he can effectively run 
this unit. This must be emphasized 
during the teaching of the leadership 



Modular presentation for hand-off to 
local slates and municipalities. 

I would think that it will be hard to 
get people to go to six leadership 
courses. Make the hard decisions of 
what to leave out and give us one or 
two courses. 

A large area of concern with officers 
is having them accept the 
responsibility of their positions. 

I don't feel comfortable with ranking 
these issues-they all need to be 
addressed. Put together a modular 
leadership program with 3 or 6 hour 
modules on each topic area. Give us 
some basic information and ideas and 
direction. ..Not an intensive 2 week 
program for each topic. These are 
areas unlike Haz Mat-A Uttle 
knowledge is not dangerous! 

We are in favor of the program, and 



would like to see it put out 
A.S.A.P. 

A review of several commercial 
offerings dealing with leadership 
topics should be conducted and 
incorporated into course 
development. 

Review existing leadership training 
type programs in the corporate world 
where successful internal programs 
are in place. 

Concentrate on basics-teach people 
to be able to communicate verbally 
and in written form. The factor 
most responsible for problems (and 
failure to correct problems before 
they occur or when they are minor) is 
the inability of supervisors to have a 
simple one-on-one meeting to 
resolve it. Work on the basic such 
as the ability to communicate and to 
understand the basic principles 
relating to problem-solving. 

Will this take the place of the current 
T-t-T programs? There is a need and 
we are attempting to address it using 
the current T-t-T program. 

Evaluation of employees for safety 
and employee assistance, i.e., 
substance abuse. 

Any new offering for officers should 
utilize non-traditional goals, such as 
interpersonal relationships and 
employee assistance which now are 
such a large part of a fire officer's 
job. 

3 hr. stand-alone module or better yet 
a supplemental resource kit. 

This is an area that deserves top 
priority for the service. 

They should be one of the top budget 
priorities. We cannot continue to do 
much with chief officers receiving 



TRADE '86 Report 
64 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



little or no training. We need these 

courses ASAP. 

Please give their development critical 

importance. 

More offerings in leadership, 
managing, and communications. 
Especially report writing and 
handling disciplinary cases. 

I beheve this is extremely important 
and we should certainly concentrate 
on changing the attitudes in the 
profession, especially in planning for 
the future and in open-minded 
Ustening to progressive ideas. 

Your direction and efforts appear 
well organized and should be helpful 



to our use at the Tech. Tng. Center. 
We have found your T-t-T program a 
great benefit and look forward to 
participating. 

Company officer responsibility as a 
trainer. 

Any program that we can effectively 
present must be on videotape, be 
modularized, and must contain a 
deemphasis on abstract theory and an 
emphasis on case study and practical 
application wherever possible. 

I feel that the Fire Academy is very 
important to the fire service and the 
attendence by more students is very 
important 



Good effort. In NC we are very 
active in this subject. We conduct a 3 
week fire admin, program and several 
other programs. We'll be glad to 
provide information. 

There are far more officers out there 
that need a leadership program for 
today-not future. On-the-job- 
training has not worked for our 
present officers. We need a program 
not for a FD with a 1,000 men but 
one with from 10 to 90 Firefighters. 

Senior level officer program sounds 
good, but is it workable with local 
instructors without the credibility of 
the National Fire Academy Staff? 



ADDITIONAL COMMENTS 

Listed below are additional comments and suggestions to the Academy from the participants 
of TRADE '86 on any curriculum topics (new courses, different planning processes, etc.) that 
were not sufficiently addressed elsewhere. 



Vermont has no full-time state-level 
instructors. Therefore we cannot 
make use of program. Should not 
have input. 

Comprehensive leadership/manage- 
ment for fire department chief 
officers. 

I would like to see more of the NFA 
curriculum activities (result oO be 
available to the state Academies. As 
we do our local development, we 
always need resources to draw upon. 

Please review the Academy's policy 
on Field Testing off-campus pro- 
grams. 

Would like to see a course for fire 
department training officers on "how 
to develop training programs" (not 
courses). 



Continue what is presentiy being 
offered. Strengthen quality and 
delivery of resident courses. 
Everyone will not be able to attend a 
course here at the Academy, but for 
those that can attend, its something 
worth reaching for. The state 
programs have been improved by the 
presence of the Academy. Keep 
carrying the banner of continuity and 
standardization in the fire service 
training by providing the hand-off 
courses and an opportunity to provide 
the Academy staff with all this advice 
each year. 

Why did you have me working a 5- 
year program when the last 10 pages 
outlined the future programs on 
modules, Haz Mat, Fire Prevention, 
and Leadership? Also, don't you 
think in 2 years when a new 



government goes into office, there 
will be new directions mandated to 
all federal agencies? 

I believe many are confused as to the 
objective of this gathering. Many 
felt, as I did, that the thrust was an 
exchange of programs and ideas. 
Suggestions: Have metio depar- 
tments submit their "innovative" 
programs for presentation to the 
group. The submissions should be 
voted upon by the group. The 
"submitters" would then be invited to 
present to the group. 

I feel that more TtT programs should 
be provided. Maybe more personnel 
solicited from the fire department to 
participate in preparing the classes in 
order to expedite them. 



TRADE '86 Report 
65 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



We need to develop and deliver 
courses at NFA for the "best of the 
best" people in a wide variety of 
major interest areas. We need to 
"finish" a subject area (i.e., arson, 
public education, computers, etc.) 
before we jump on the next hot issue 
(i.e., Haz Mat, firefighter safety) 
area. Generally, NFA does an 
excellent job. You need less 
professional bureaucrats and 
consultants and more fire service 
professionals in staff and 
administration positions. (Manno, 
Clark, etc. are great people.) These 
people must relate to the fire service. 
When did fire service become one 
word and auditorium in J needs 
wireless remote mike system, new 
podium, a best-money-can-by 
overhead projector system with 
screen. Present system is a joke for 
this institution. 

Suggest developing a standard for a 
physical fitness program which can 
eventually become mandatory. 
Expand regional training, expand 
number of adjuncts to allow for 
maximum travel distance of 3(X) 
miles. 

New coiu'ses: budget preparation, 
presentation, and maintaining. 
Wellness in fitness, substance abuse, 
and stress. Key in on prevention, 
recognition, and treatment 
Management skill to handle 
employees. 

Standardization at all levels in the 
fire service. Fire department. Budget 
preparation and understanding at staff 
levels of cities or districts (budget 
analyst). 

I feel a target audience may be more 
strongly directed toward immediate 
change of administrators and long- 
range development of potential 
leaders. Therefore, an eventual "catch- 
up" would occur. Selection to these 



programs should also be made with 
consideration of the informal 
organizational chart where lower rank 
personnel are involved in 
"movement" but not necessarily the 
authority for such movement 

Have courses for prospective officers. 

Plans are ambiguous. Complete 
staffing up to the mandate level of 38 
needed. FEMA officials should 
realize the tremendous damage they 
are doing to the country. 

Properly staff and provide an income 
level that will maintain professional 
personnel to develop and deliver 
courses. 

Once again [there is] a lack of 
understanding of state/federal 
financial relationships. On or about 
April 15, resources flow from the 
country to Washington, DC. The 
remainder of the year, money is 
supposed to flow back to the state 
and local governments. If you can't 
send money, don't send work. If we 
had the money to teach Haz Mat, 
we'd already be doing it Also, 
please stop developing a ciuriculum 
with the assumption state and local 
fire training agencies lack 
competence. Find out what exists or 
doesn't before planning your 
programs. That should include 
existing programs, faciUties, 
instructional staff, expertise, and 
funds. 

The morning session was devoted to 
doing some work and then this 
afternoon we were told the programs 
were worked out and how we felt 
about them. What is going on? 

Since this is the NFA why isn't there 
an adequate lens on the overhead 
projector to put a proper, legible, 
image on the screen in the 
auditorium? 



Work on the basics such as the 
liability to communicate and to 
understand the basic principles 
relating to problem solving. Have 
one simple meeting to resolve it 

A body of national training 
representatives fixjm the TRADE 
network should be identified to assist 
the Academy staff with guidance 
relative to program developement and 
delivery. This would facilitate 
communication and allow for more 
timely and in-depth handling of NFA 
issues of concerns to the nation's fire 
service. 

When you can only come once a year 
it sure takes a long, long time to get 
educated. Losing good people 
because of politics will surely reduce 
if not destroy the effectiveness and 
credibility of this facility. 

Your programs must be modularized 
for local presentation under varying 
delivery constraints. A straight 2- 
week course cannot be adapted to 3- 
hour a week modules, but 3-hour 
modules can be "stacked" to create a 
2-week course. Give us the 
flexibility to mix and match the 
module time (3 hrs, 2 x 3 hrs) to 
best fill the instructional time 
available. Modules also allow for 
curriculum modification and update 
without restructuring the whole 
program. There seems to be a 
certification groundswell in training 
at the present time. The NFA should 
produce a standarized (national) 
program and process for achieving 
certification from Firefighter I 
through officer, training instructor, 
prevention specialist, etc. It seems 
that each state is following a little 
different track in providing a 
certification process even though the 
same standards are being met The 
Academy could and must take a 
leadership position in unifying the 
processes through a national 



TRADE '86 Report 
66 



Appendix: NFA Curriculum Survey Results 



approach to certification testing 
which would assure minimum levels 
of testing and accreditation. Each 
state could then subscribe to each 
testing process as needed based on the 
Academy's materials and procedures. 
The Academy would produce basic 
training curriculum (from existing 
programs and new programs) and 
most importantly develop written and 
practical skill tests and testing 
procedures for handing off to each 
state. 

The entire program should be geared 
to meeting national standards so that 
an entry-level person can set his 
goals and follow a track to achieve 
his needs. We also fall short in 
preparing our personnel for 
management-type positions. Areas 
such as budget, preparation, 
justification, etc. are not covered well 
enough. 

There has been much discussion over 
the past 2 days concerning many 
aspects of fire service training but 
no mention of emergency medical 
service. While EMS training for the 
provider is addressed by other 
organizations, this is the only body 
addressing EMS management and 



administration in the fire service. 
There should be an analysis to 
determine if the residents and one 
field course meets the needs of EMS 
officer and fire service managers with 
EMS programs. At several meetings 
of fire service EMS personnel there 
has been frequent discussion of the 
need for mass casualty training 
(would be good hand-off program). 
Is "rescue" included in any programs? 
While rescue techniques are hands-on, 
the concepts of rescue and rescue 
technology and training should be 
included in training for CO and mid- 
level supervisors since they supervise 
or administer rescue program. 

I would love to be able to talk to the 
Academy personnel regarding a Fire 
Prevention Program which can be 
done on a local level by local 
personnel. 

Aircraft crash rescue. Mass casualty. 

I find lack of local government 
support and knowledge is a national 
problem. How can an executive 
officer direct without knowledge? 

Not enough consideration given to 
instructors in the admission criteria 



listed for most courses. The NFA 
cannot train all officers. They can 
have a greater impact by training 
more trainers with the resources 
being devoted now to train end-users. 

In spite of comments in auditorium, 
NFA has provided very good classes. 
Most have been needed and in the 
right area. 

Conduct management level training 
at Academy. Support operational 
training at state and local level. 

To FEMA all divisions/agencies: I 
would respectfully suggest the 
existing format for teleconferences 
(satellite broadcasts) be discontinued. 
They do not hold the interest of fire 
service personnel, particularly panel 
discussions. More "field footage" of 
the problem and solution would help, 
as would the lessening of studio 
discussion. I would personally prefer 
a short, live introduction, and a fast- 
moving graphic illustration of the 
selected topic. More action and less 
polite discussion. Ideally, I would 
like to see our conferences as fast- 
paced as a newscast or professional 
"slick" video, i.e., "American Heat." 



TRADE '86 Report 
67 



Appendix: Teleconference Survey Results 



Teleconference Survey 

Attendees at TRADE '86 were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding participation in FEMA's 
Emergency Education Network (EENET) video teleconferences. The following summaries represent 
aggregate responses of all conference attendees. 



.. ^ , ^^^ ^v. ^ .. JIH 


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Have you received 
information about FE!\/IA's 
Emergency Education 
NETworl< 
videoconferences? 


97 


3 






YES 






YES NO 













Does your department/ 
agency have its own 
satellite receiving 
station (dish)? 



NO 

(by 2-1 margin) 




If not, does your department 
or organization intend to 
install a receive station 
in the future? 



Evenly split between 
YES and NO 



YES 




MAYBE NO 



TRADE '86 Report 



68 



Appendix: Teleconference Survey Results 



•^^'sr^'^'Ty 



^"•^^■"•5N^"'?"««'"'S^"':^"'"W!'"'V '.■•■^v" 



Does your department/ 
agency receive the 
broadcasts? 



YES 

(by a 2-1 margin) 




If your department receives 
the videoconferences, are 
the sessions being taped ? 




YES Indirectly NO 




If SO [if the sessions are being taped] 
how many people total are reached by the 
program [through viewing the live broadcast 
or by viewing the videotapes]? 



55 responding organizations indicated 
12,000 personnel reached. 

There are 184 organizations in TRADE. 



TRADE '86 Report 



69 



Appendix: Teleconference Survey Results 



What subject areas would 
you like FEMA 
videoconferences to 
address? 



Major 
interests are: 

-Fire department 
management 

-Hazardous Materials 



TOPIC 

Hot issues 

Fire Department 
iVIanagement 

Firefighter Safety 

Haz IVIat and 
Haz Mat Safety 

Weiiness Pgms 

Liability 

ICS/IEiVIS 

Women in the 
Fire Service 



NUMBER 

OF REQUESTS 




7I4 



10 




TRADE '86 Report 
70 



Appendix: State Certification Program Matrix 



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♦All Field courses will provide one (1) college credit hour as an elective (Alabama State Fire College) 

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♦♦♦Slate identifier and course(s) adopted 

♦♦♦♦Approved by the National Registry of EMT's for Continuing Education Credit for EMT Recertification. 3/26/87 


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TRADE '86 Report 



71 



Appendix: Front of Request for Student Manuals Form 




National Fire Academy »k ie 

National Emergency Training Center *^*^" -^ 
REQUEST FOR STUDENT MANUALS 



1. Name of Requesting Office (Include Name of Contact Person and Office Pfione) 


2. Date Required 




3. Contractor Control No 


4. To: Student Manual Support Program 
Field Programs Division 
National Fire Academy 
16825 South Seton Avenue 
Emmitsburg, MD 21727-8995 


5. SHIP TO: (Mailing address , include ATTN: line) 


6. REQUIREMENTS 1 


Pubfcation Title 


Quantity 
ReauirBd 














































































7. Tyf)edPrinted Name and Title of Requestor 


8. Signature of Requestor / Date of Request 



TF-NF-FP Feb. 1987 



TRADE '86 Repon 
72 



Appendix: Back of Request for Student Manuals Form 



INSTRUCTIONS 

A. General 

Each participating State, Metropolitan Fire Department, U.S. Military 
Department and Trust Territory MUST have a National Fire Academy (NFA) 
trained instructor or an instructor trained by an Academy trained 
instructor for each course for which manuals are requested in order to 
be eligible to receive free student manuals. 

Multiple course titles may be requested on each Request Form. Requests 
for student manuals, including up to a six month supply for each organ- 
ization, are encouraged. 

These forms may be reproduced locally by participating organizations or 
may be obtained by writing or calling: 

Field Programs Division 
National Fire Academy 
16825 South Seton Avenue 
Emmitsburg, Maryland 21727-8995 
(301) 447-1000 

Each request should be prepared to reach the NFA NO LATER THAN 45 DAYS 
BEFORE the manuals are required for the earliest scheduled class. 

B. Preparation Steps 

Block 1. Self explanatory. 

Block 2. List the earliest date any manual on the Request is required for 
a class being taught. SHIPPING TIME REQUIRED IS A MINIMUM OF 
45 DAYS FROM THE DATE THE REQUEST IS RECEIVED BY THE ACADEMY. 

Block 3. Leave blank. 

Block 4. The address where this form is to be sent. 

Block 5. Complete mailing address of the location to which the manuals are 
to be sent, to include "ATTN:" of an individual. 

Block 6. Complete title of each manual required and the number of each. 

Block 7. Typed/printed name of the Requestor. Requestor must be the autho- 
rized, designated representative of the participating organization, 

Block 8. Signature of the Requestor and DATE OF THE REQUEST . 

TF-NF-FP Feb. 1987 



TRADE '86 Report 



73 



Appendix: Course Information Data Postcard 



FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 

COURSE INFORMATION DATA 


COURSE TITLE 






OATEiSi HELD 


LOCATION (City and Slalel 


INSTRUCTOR 


NUMBER OR STUDEN''S IN CLASS 


INSTRUCTORS EMPLO-tMENT 


AFFILIATION 


PiiONL !l'- 


■lude area codei 


STUDENT BREAKDOWN (Give r 
CAREER 


umDer o' sludenls in each calegoryi 

VOI UNTFFR . _ OTHER iSpfinfvi 




INSTRUCTORS COMMENTS 






FEMA Form 13 - 16. MAY 84 


EDITION OF APR 82 IS OBSOLETE 





Federal Emergency Management Agency 
National Emergency Training Center 
Emmitsburg, Maryland 21727 

Official Business 

Penalty for Private Use, $300 



BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO 1 1989 Washington. D C 



Postage Wnt Be Paid by Federal Emergency Managemeni Agency 

Deputy Superintendent 

Field Programs Division 

National Emergency Training Center 

National Fire Academy 

16825 South Seton Avenue 

Emmitsburg, Maryland 21727-9985 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



TRADE '86 Report 

74